INTRODUCTION

It is a common-place that the practical fruits of modern natural science have transformed the face of the earth and the lives of men. Nor is it less well-recognized that these fruits are frequently the products of difficult theoretical conceptions and of a disciplined method of inquiry. It is therefore not surprising that although everyone to-day is exposed to the impact of applied science, familiarity with the theoretical and logical foundations of scientific advance is not widespread.

It may nevertheless seem like a paradox that even distinguished men of science often possess no clear ideas concerning the theoretical notions they employ or the logic of inquiry they practice. The paradox is mitigated, however, if one recalls that this fact has parallels in other areas of human activity. A great painter or a great athlete is not always the best expounder of his art, because he may never have felt the need to reflect deeply on what is involved in his achievements or to formulate clearly the principles of his procedure.

There are, indeed, two circumstances which help explain why it is that high competence in special areas of science may go hand in hand with considerable naivete about the character of the scientific enterprise. Men are usually trained for a career of research by acquiring through repeated practice habits of workmanship conforming to implicit standards of excellence, rather than by learning some codified system of rules for the conduct of inquiry. In consequence, a man can be an extraordinarily gifted investigator of nature without being able to articulate the logic he employs; and should he be pressed to describe for some ceremonial occasion the principles of his method, he will most likely reproduce the half-forgotten philosophical credos he may have acquired during his years of intellectual immaturity. As Einstein once advised his readers, if one wishes to learn what are the methods theoretical physicists use, "don't listen to their words, fix your attention on their deeds." It is usually only when their habitual methods are found to be unequal to new problems, that scientists feel impelled to reflect seriously on questions of scientific procedure and to formulate with care the principles of scientific method.

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Grammar of Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 401

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.