The Rise of the American Film: A Critical History

By Lewis Jacobs | Go to book overview

XV
GROWING SOPHISTICATION OF FILM CONTENT

TWO important developments occurred during the period 1914- 1918 that profoundly influenced the character and implications of motion picture content. One was a change within the industry: the broader and new type of audience; the other was an outside development: the World War. Each carried movie content further in its development; each focused attention on the screen's power as a social agency. Together they quickened the industry to a consciousness of movie content as a social record, as propaganda, and as en tertainment for the world. By the close of the war, movie content was being deliberately prepared for its three aims: to portray, to mold, and to divert twentieth-century America.

The moralism and religiousness that had characterized movies of the pre-war period found simple expression in the title of the best- selling novel and play for 1913, 1914, and 1915: Pollyanna. A consummation of old ideals, "Pollyanna philosophy" became the dominant note in moving pictures. It was based on the old spiritual axiom that contentment with one's lot makes for real and lasting happiness; that riches and luxuries cannot buy peace of mind, but bring disaster. It was better to be poor than rich because, as movies continued to show, the poor were always loving, kind, true, and full of virtue. The poor mother idolized her children, worked and slaved for them; the father loved the mother and seldom strayed from the happy home. Cheerfulness, optimism, love, and honesty were the essentials of well-being, and one did not need money to have them.

The Pollyanna ideal was personified first and foremost by Mary

-264-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of the American Film: A Critical History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 590

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.