The Rise of the American Film: A Critical History

By Lewis Jacobs | Go to book overview

XVI
BIG BUSINESS

IN 1918 the movie industry was shaken by a serious loss of patronage because of the influenza epidemic and the absence of millions of men at the front or in training camps. The public's distaste for war films after the Armistice was also a threat to the industry's well- being. But the setback was only temporary. Recouping their losses, producers quickly resumed expansion and consolidation. Inter-organizational rivalry attained proportions that made the old trust war seem petty. Having realized its fundamental large-scale characteristics, the industry began its ten years of growth as big business--a growth to be intensified, in the closing years, by the sudden and revolutionary addition of sound.

Unrivaled by foreign films during the four war years, American films were firmly established not only at home but in all parts of the globe--even in India, western Asia, and Africa. In 1919 American motion pictures exclusively were being shown in South America; in Europe ninety per cent of the movies shown originated in the United States. Hollywood had become the unquestioned motion picture center of the world.

The post-war period was one of unrestraint in business as in life generally. To be important a thing had to be big--and so the movie became one of the biggest things in American civilization. Everything connected with it was inflated, materially and psychologically. Companies, studios, productions, theatres, salaries, sales, advertising --all took on gigantic proportions. Excesses were characteristic of the hysteria and booming prosperity of "the jazz age."

Profits, huge though they were, were not big enough to finance

-287-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of the American Film: A Critical History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 590

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.