The American Class Structure

By Joseph A. Kahl | Go to book overview
will highlight that part of their work which is of central relevance to the one variable under discussion, and minimize the rest. This method delays a balanced picture of stratification until Chapter VII, where the pieces, first analytically separated and discussed in detail, are put together into a portrait of the whole [13].
REFERENCES
Quoted in The Age of Jackson by Arthur Schlesinger Jr. ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1945), p. 10.
Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, Manifesto of the Communist Party ( New York: International Publishers, 1932), p. 9.
One of the best Marxist attempts to work out the details can be found in the work of a man later purged by Moscow: Nikolai Bukharin, Historical Materialism ( New York: International Publishers, 1932). For a concise analysis that is more objective, see Reinhard Bendix and Sey mour M. Lipset , "Karl Marx' Theory of Social Classes," in their Class, Status and Power ( Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press, 1953), which is a useful collection of diverse materials on stratification. For a more elaborate analysis of Marx, see G. D. H. Cole, What Is Meant by Marxism ( London: Gollancz, 1948).
Max Weber, "Class, Status, Party," in From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, translated and edited by H. H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1946), pp. 186-93. Published in German in 1925.
Ibid ., p. 194.
For a theoretical system which is, in part, built on Weber, see Talcott Parsons , The Structure of Social Action ( Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press, 1949; first published, 1937). Applied to stratification, see Talcott Par sons , "An Analytical Approach to the Theory of Social Stratification," American Journal of Sociology, XLV ( May, 1940), 841-62, which is reprinted in his Essays in Sociological Theory ( Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press, 1949). This essay, which has had a very wide influence, has been expanded and put into the framework of Parsons' more recent general theory: "A Revised Analytical Approach to the Theory of Social Stratification," in Bendix and Lipset, Class, Status and Power. The reader who is not a sophisticate in the thought of Parsons will do better with the earlier version.
Recent American work in stratification has mainly consisted of empirical research; our intellectual forefathers, however, were more interested in theoretical discussion. See Charles H. Page, Class and American Sociology ( New York: Dial, 1940), a discussion of such early sociologists as Ward, Small, and Sumner. Of course, our early political leaders were much concerned with class, as evidenced by such disputations as The Federalist Papers; it is interesting to note that only in more recent

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The American Class Structure
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Tables xvii
  • Figures xviii
  • I - The Dimensions of Class 1
  • References 16
  • II - Position and Prestige 19
  • Conclusions 47
  • References 49
  • III - Occupational Prestige and Social Change 53
  • Conclusions 85
  • References 87
  • IV - Income, Wealth, and Style of Life 91
  • Conclusions 119
  • References 122
  • V - The Web of Interaction 127
  • Conclusions 153
  • References 154
  • VI - Class Consciousness and Political Ideology 157
  • Conclusions 180
  • References 181
  • VII - Classes as Ideal Types: Emergent Values 184
  • Conclusions 215
  • References 218
  • VIII - Ethnic and Race Barriers 221
  • Conclusions 247
  • References 248
  • IX - Succession and Mobility: the Occupational Base 251
  • Conclusions 271
  • References 272
  • X - Succession and Mobility: Motivation and Education 276
  • Conclusions 293
  • References 294
  • Index 301
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