The American Class Structure

By Joseph A. Kahl | Go to book overview

VI
Class Consciousness and Political Ideology

IN PITTSBURGH 73 YEARS AGO, THE MEN WHO BEGAN THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR . . . WROTE IN THE PREAMBLE TO ITS CONSTITUTION: "A STRUGGLE IS GOING ON IN ALL THE NATIONS OF THE CIVILIZED WORLD BETWEEN THE OPPRESSORS AND THE OPPRESSED OF ALL COUNTRIES, A STRUGGLE BETWEEN THE CAPITALIST AND THE LABORER, WHICH GROWS IN INTENSITY FROM YEAR TO YEAR."

IN WASHINGTON LAST WEEK, 20 A.F.L. AND C.I.O. LEADERS, WHO PLAN TO MERGE FORCES AT A JOINT CONVENTION NEXT DECEMBER, AGREED ON A NEW CONSTITUTION. . . . INSTEAD OF ECHOING THE MARXIST MANIFESTO, THE NEW PREAMBLE PROCLAIMS ALLEGIANCE TO "OUR WAY OF LIFE AND THE FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOMS WHICH ARE THE BASIS OF OUR DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY." THE WORDS "STRUGGLE," "OPPRESSED," "CAPITALIST" AND "LABORER" ARE NOT EVEN MENTIONED IN THE DOCUMENT.

Time [1]

WHEN PARENTS SAY to their children, "Our type of people don't behave that way," whom do they mean? When they say, "Don't play with children like that," to whom do they refer? How do Americans categorize themselves vis-a-vis others, and what do these categories imply about shared ideas and joint action?

If you ask a man who he is, he will probably reply by using one or two labels [2]. If you persist, and ask for all the labels that properly apply to him, you might get a list something like this:

John O'Connel Catholic
American Irishman
Lawyer Chicagoan

He is unlikely to add: upper-middle class. In that sense Americans are not class-conscious.

But suppose you continue the conversation. You ask him what it means to be a lawyer. He might tell you that he became a lawyer

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Class Structure
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Tables xvii
  • Figures xviii
  • I - The Dimensions of Class 1
  • References 16
  • II - Position and Prestige 19
  • Conclusions 47
  • References 49
  • III - Occupational Prestige and Social Change 53
  • Conclusions 85
  • References 87
  • IV - Income, Wealth, and Style of Life 91
  • Conclusions 119
  • References 122
  • V - The Web of Interaction 127
  • Conclusions 153
  • References 154
  • VI - Class Consciousness and Political Ideology 157
  • Conclusions 180
  • References 181
  • VII - Classes as Ideal Types: Emergent Values 184
  • Conclusions 215
  • References 218
  • VIII - Ethnic and Race Barriers 221
  • Conclusions 247
  • References 248
  • IX - Succession and Mobility: the Occupational Base 251
  • Conclusions 271
  • References 272
  • X - Succession and Mobility: Motivation and Education 276
  • Conclusions 293
  • References 294
  • Index 301
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.