The American Class Structure

By Joseph A. Kahl | Go to book overview

REFERENCES
Sigmund Freud in a letter to his fiancée, August 29, 1883 (stimulated by a visit to the opera Carmen with its vivid mob scenes); quoted in Ernest Jones , The Life and Work of Sigmund Freud ( New York: Basic Books, 1953), Vol. I, pp. 190-91.
I draw heavily on the writings of the Kluckhohns. See Clyde Kluckhohn, et al., "Values and Value-Orientations in the Theory of Action," in Toward a General Theory of Action, Talcott Parsons and Edward A. Shils , eds. ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1951); Florence R. Kluckhohn , "Dominant and Substitute Profiles of Cultural Orientations: Their Significance for Social Stratification," Social Forces, XXVIII ( May, 1950), 376-93; Clyde and Florence R. Kluckhohn, "American Culture: Generalized Orientations and Class Patterns," in Conflicts of Power in Modern Culture ( New York: Harper, 1946).

My thinking has also been strongly influenced by Talcott Parsons, The Structure of Social Action ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1937). For a general description of American values that stems from the same philosophic and scientific roots, see Robin M. Williams Jr., "Value Orientations in American Society," in American Society ( New York: Knopf, 1951), Chap. XI.

Much of the material in this chapter represents generalizations from data presented elsewhere in this book; references will not be repeated here.

It is my opinion that the newer techniques of attitude scaling and group projective testing would be helpful in testing generalizations such as these, and that it would now be a more strategic use of research effort to conduct such tests rather than repeat community studies to get more qualitative descriptions of class values.

Much of the current empirical data on American life shows differences related to class level--differences in intelligence, personality, health, physical and mental disease, consumption behavior, tastes in reading, sex, family patterns, and so on. Some are tied to one aspect of stratification, such as education or income; others reflect the total class pattern. For some summaries that will lead the reader beyond data in this book, he may consult: Pitirim Sorokin, Social Mobility ( New York: Harper, 1927); Kurt B. Mayer, Class and Society ( Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1955); "Differential Class Behavior," Class, Status and Power, Reinhard Bendix and Seymour M. Lipset, eds. (Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press, 1953), Part III; Frank Auld, "Influence of Social Class on Personality Test Responses," Psychological Bulletin, XLIX ( July, 1952), 318-32; A. Anastasi and J. P. Foley, Differential Psychology ( New York: Macmillan, rev. ed., 1949), Chap. XXIII; August B. Hollingshead and Fred erick C. Redlich , "Social Stratification and Psychiatric Disorders," American Sociological Review, XVIII ( April, 1953), 163-70.
E. Digby Baltzell has made good use of these books to show the connections between the old and the new families in the upper class:

-218-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Class Structure
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Tables xvii
  • Figures xviii
  • I - The Dimensions of Class 1
  • References 16
  • II - Position and Prestige 19
  • Conclusions 47
  • References 49
  • III - Occupational Prestige and Social Change 53
  • Conclusions 85
  • References 87
  • IV - Income, Wealth, and Style of Life 91
  • Conclusions 119
  • References 122
  • V - The Web of Interaction 127
  • Conclusions 153
  • References 154
  • VI - Class Consciousness and Political Ideology 157
  • Conclusions 180
  • References 181
  • VII - Classes as Ideal Types: Emergent Values 184
  • Conclusions 215
  • References 218
  • VIII - Ethnic and Race Barriers 221
  • Conclusions 247
  • References 248
  • IX - Succession and Mobility: the Occupational Base 251
  • Conclusions 271
  • References 272
  • X - Succession and Mobility: Motivation and Education 276
  • Conclusions 293
  • References 294
  • Index 301
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.