Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People

By Writers' Program of the Work Projects Administration in the State of Wyoming | Go to book overview

Introduction

ONE HUNDRED years ago Bill Nye, Wyoming's most famous newspaper editor, complained that the onrush of civilization had "knocked the essential joy out of the life of the pioneer." He observed that " you walk over chaos where the 'hydraulic' has plowed up the valley like a convulsion." Other editors and businessmen were not disturbed by the changes they saw. Indeed, most of them wanted more "civilization."

Recently strip mining and other developments have revived Bill Nye's complaint. In 1980 many citizens took seriously the prophecy that Wyoming, which the Wall Street Journal had called the "Lonesome Land" in 1968, was destined to become a "national sacrifice area." It is an appropriate time to bring out a new edition of the long out-of-print Wyoming Guide because the book gives us a splendid portrait of Wyoming as it was long before all these modern changes began.

Two Wyoming natives, both graduates of the University of Wyoming, wrote most of the Guide. They worked under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration, which supported the preparation of such books in all states. The supervisor and editor-in-chief. Agnes Wright Spring, was born on a ranch on the Little Laramie River near Centennial in 1894. Now retired and living in Fort Collins. Colorado, she can look back on a record of great accomplishments as journalist, state librarian of Wyoming, state historian--first of Wyoming and later of Colorado--editor of the Colorado Magazine, and author of many books. Her associate, the senior editor of the Guide, Dee Linford ( 1915-71). was born in western Wyoming's Star Valley. Younger brother of Ernest H. Linford, the well-known newspaper editor and journalism professor, Dee wrote Man without a Star ( 1952), which the distinguished critic and University of Wyoming English professor Ruth Hudson rated as "the most honest and competent fictional treatment of the Wyoming scene yet written and one of the most authentic novels dealing with the history of the cattle country."

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Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xix
  • Illustrations xxi
  • Maps xxv
  • General Information xxxi
  • Calendar of Annual Events xxxvii
  • PART I - Wyoming: Past and Present 1
  • Contemporary Scene 3
  • Natural Setting 11
  • Archeology and Indians 49
  • History 58
  • Transportation 79
  • Industry, Commerce and Labor 90
  • Agriculture 98
  • Education 109
  • Sports and Recreation 117
  • Folklore and Folkways 122
  • Literature 127
  • The Theater 137
  • Music 147
  • Art 155
  • Architecture 161
  • Part II - Cities 171
  • Casper 173
  • Cheyenne 183
  • Laramie 195
  • Sheridan 206
  • PART III - Tours 215
  • Tour 1 217
  • Tour 2a 251
  • Tour 2c 253
  • Tour 3 267
  • Tour 4a 292
  • Tour 4b 300
  • Tour 6 318
  • Tour 6a 339
  • Tour 7a 341
  • Tour 8 350
  • Tour 9 356
  • Tour 10 367
  • Tour 11 380
  • Yellowstone National Park 392
  • PART IV - Appendices 439
  • Chronology 441
  • Bibliography 449
  • Glossary 459
  • 1940 - Census Figures 467
  • Index 469
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