Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People

By Writers' Program of the Work Projects Administration in the State of Wyoming | Go to book overview

History

INTO the region that is now the State of Wyoming came explorers, daring fur traders and trappers, friendly and hostile Indians, travel-weary emigrants, and missionaries; scientists, gold-seekers, frontier soldiers, pony express riders, telegraph operators, and stagecoach drivers; English and French nobility bent on big game hunts, railroad builders, cattle barons and cowboys, sheep owners and herders, bandits and rustlers, diamond swindlers, courageous homeseekers, and settlers.

Wyoming is the only State composed of territory acquired from all four of the principal annexations to the original United States. Parts of the state have been claimed at times by five nations, and some 30 changes of boundary have resulted in the present rectangle now on the map.

Although little or nothing was known of the vast territory beyond the Mississippi Valley and Wyoming remained untenanted by white men, Spain, after Columbus's discovery of America, claimed the continent under the papal 'bull' in 1493 as part of the 'countries inhabited by infidels'; her claim being given greater force by De Soto's discovery of the Mississippi River in 1541. The Spanish claim to the country east of the Rocky Mountains was superseded by that of France following the 1682 expedition of La Salle, who gave the territory the name of Louisiana.

France ceded to Spain the western part of this basin in 1762, but in 1792 Lieutenant W. R. Broughton of the Vancouver Expedition claimed the basin of the Columbia River for Great Britain, though Captain Robert Gray of Boston was the first to discover the river in the same year. In 1800 France regained the region that had been relinquished to Spain. This was purchased by the United States in 1803 and was formed into the District of Louisiana in 1804, and then into the Territory of Louisiana in 1805. In 1812 it was organized into Missouri Territory, and in 1834 was made into the Indian Country.

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Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xix
  • Illustrations xxi
  • Maps xxv
  • General Information xxxi
  • Calendar of Annual Events xxxvii
  • PART I - Wyoming: Past and Present 1
  • Contemporary Scene 3
  • Natural Setting 11
  • Archeology and Indians 49
  • History 58
  • Transportation 79
  • Industry, Commerce and Labor 90
  • Agriculture 98
  • Education 109
  • Sports and Recreation 117
  • Folklore and Folkways 122
  • Literature 127
  • The Theater 137
  • Music 147
  • Art 155
  • Architecture 161
  • Part II - Cities 171
  • Casper 173
  • Cheyenne 183
  • Laramie 195
  • Sheridan 206
  • PART III - Tours 215
  • Tour 1 217
  • Tour 2a 251
  • Tour 2c 253
  • Tour 3 267
  • Tour 4a 292
  • Tour 4b 300
  • Tour 6 318
  • Tour 6a 339
  • Tour 7a 341
  • Tour 8 350
  • Tour 9 356
  • Tour 10 367
  • Tour 11 380
  • Yellowstone National Park 392
  • PART IV - Appendices 439
  • Chronology 441
  • Bibliography 449
  • Glossary 459
  • 1940 - Census Figures 467
  • Index 469
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