Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People

By Writers' Program of the Work Projects Administration in the State of Wyoming | Go to book overview

Tour 6A

Junction with US 14-20-- Lovell--Cowley--Frannie--( Billings, Montana); US 310.

Junction with US 14-20 to Montana Line, 49.6 m.

Oil-surfaced; open all year.

Route paralleled by Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R.

Accommodations in larger towns.

US 310 is a short cut between US 20 (seeTour 6) and US 10 in Montana. State 114 branches southwestward from it at Deaver to unite with US 14-20 at Cody (seeTour 6c).

US 310 branches northwest from US 14-20 (seeTours 10 and 6), 0 m., at a point 4.8 miles west of Greybull, in one of the most arid and barren regions of Wyoming. For 20 miles there is no vegetation, except stunted clumps of salt sage. The wind whips fine dirt from the eroded hillsides and weathered sandstone protrudes from low ridges, like the plates on an armored dinosaur's back. In the distance (R) are high hills, broken midway by a deep canyon. The outlines of the Carter Mountains are dim in the southwest.

At 25 m., the highway enters the irrigated and fertile Lovell beet- growing district, a part of the Shoshone Reclamation Project (see Tour 6c). The gray, alkaline desert soil contrasts with the velvet green of the beet and bean fields. Drab adobe dwellings of Mexican seasonal workers squat in field corners.

At 28.5 m. is the southern junction with State 14 (seeTour 10A), which unites with US 310 for 2.9 miles.

LOVELL , 28.7 m. (3,814 alt., 1,857 pop.), largest town in northwestern Wyoming and an important supply point on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, is a busy, attractive town of wide streets and handsome buildings. It was founded by Mormon colonists who came into the region in 1900 (see below), and was named for a bigscale rancher who had preceded the Mormon settlers. During the beet campaign, the population is considerably increased by sugar-factory workers.

The GREAT WESTERN SUGAR FACTORY (R) , 29.5 m., a group of pressed-brick buildings on landscaped grounds, was built in 1916; irrigation, begun in 1909, had previously made sugar-beet cultivation a thriving industry. During the fall campaign (harvest and refining season), the plant is the center of regional activity. Three crews keep

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Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xix
  • Illustrations xxi
  • Maps xxv
  • General Information xxxi
  • Calendar of Annual Events xxxvii
  • PART I - Wyoming: Past and Present 1
  • Contemporary Scene 3
  • Natural Setting 11
  • Archeology and Indians 49
  • History 58
  • Transportation 79
  • Industry, Commerce and Labor 90
  • Agriculture 98
  • Education 109
  • Sports and Recreation 117
  • Folklore and Folkways 122
  • Literature 127
  • The Theater 137
  • Music 147
  • Art 155
  • Architecture 161
  • Part II - Cities 171
  • Casper 173
  • Cheyenne 183
  • Laramie 195
  • Sheridan 206
  • PART III - Tours 215
  • Tour 1 217
  • Tour 2a 251
  • Tour 2c 253
  • Tour 3 267
  • Tour 4a 292
  • Tour 4b 300
  • Tour 6 318
  • Tour 6a 339
  • Tour 7a 341
  • Tour 8 350
  • Tour 9 356
  • Tour 10 367
  • Tour 11 380
  • Yellowstone National Park 392
  • PART IV - Appendices 439
  • Chronology 441
  • Bibliography 449
  • Glossary 459
  • 1940 - Census Figures 467
  • Index 469
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