Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People

By Writers' Program of the Work Projects Administration in the State of Wyoming | Go to book overview

slopes of both moraines are heavily timbered; the southern slopes have scattered forest and much low growth.

At the mouth of TETON GLACIER CANYON, 42.1 m., is the junction with the Glacier Trail; L. here up the steep, rugged canyon to SURPRISE LAKE, 3 m. (9,650 alt.), AMPHITHEATER LAKE, 3.2 m. (9,750 alt.), and the most easily accessible glacier area in the Tetons. The bridle trail ends on a high ridge overlooking Amphitheater Lake; R. here 1 m. over loose broken boulders to TETON GLACIER. (Lose as little elevation as possible; cross last high moraine where it abuts (L) against basement rock of Grand Teton's northeast ridge; do not start rocks rolling, or slide when crossing snowfields; stay away from glacier crevices.)

Glacier Canyon was carved by water before the glacial epoch; when snow accumulated at its head faster than it could melt, the glacier was formed. Its tremendous weight, together with the wrenching action of melting and freezing, formed the cirque in which it rests. Armed with rocks frozen into its sides and floor, the glacier scoured out the lower part of the canyon and deepened, widened, and smoothed the original chasm. Erosion and deposition continue today; the high loose ridge that encloses the lower end of the glacier is still being built up.

The Lakes Trail continues northward across a treeless flat, covered with glacial debris. At 44.8 m. is the junction with the Jenny Lake section of Lakes Trail, 0.7 m. west of the Jenny Lake Museum (see above).

South of the JENNY LAKE ENTRANCE, 5.9 m., Park Drive unites with US 187 for 4-7 miles (see Tour 7a). It branches R. over graveled roadbed at 10.6 m., and runs straight to PARK HEADQUARTERS, 11.6 m., a small cluster of peeled-log buildings under a high flagstaff.


Tour 8

( Custer, S. Dak.)--Newcastle--Gillette--Buffalo--Worland; US 6. South Dakota Line to Worland, 283.9 m.

Route paralleled by Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R.R. between Newcastle and Ucross; by Wyoming R.R. between Ucross and Buffalo. Oil-surfaced between South Dakota Line and Buffalo; graveled between Buffalo and Worland. Open June 1-Oct. 1 between Buffalo and Worland; snow in winter sometimes 15 to 30 feet deep. Accommodations limited.

US 16 crosses the Wyoming Line in a little green valley between red hills. The Black Hills of South Dakota bulk up to the east. In Weston County, northwest of Newcastle, the highway runs for 20 to 30 miles across the corner of a huge Land Utilization Project, estab-

-356-

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Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xix
  • Illustrations xxi
  • Maps xxv
  • General Information xxxi
  • Calendar of Annual Events xxxvii
  • PART I - Wyoming: Past and Present 1
  • Contemporary Scene 3
  • Natural Setting 11
  • Archeology and Indians 49
  • History 58
  • Transportation 79
  • Industry, Commerce and Labor 90
  • Agriculture 98
  • Education 109
  • Sports and Recreation 117
  • Folklore and Folkways 122
  • Literature 127
  • The Theater 137
  • Music 147
  • Art 155
  • Architecture 161
  • Part II - Cities 171
  • Casper 173
  • Cheyenne 183
  • Laramie 195
  • Sheridan 206
  • PART III - Tours 215
  • Tour 1 217
  • Tour 2a 251
  • Tour 2c 253
  • Tour 3 267
  • Tour 4a 292
  • Tour 4b 300
  • Tour 6 318
  • Tour 6a 339
  • Tour 7a 341
  • Tour 8 350
  • Tour 9 356
  • Tour 10 367
  • Tour 11 380
  • Yellowstone National Park 392
  • PART IV - Appendices 439
  • Chronology 441
  • Bibliography 449
  • Glossary 459
  • 1940 - Census Figures 467
  • Index 469
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