Medical Gridlock and Health Reform

By Eli Ginzberg | Go to book overview

3
Central Cities and Their Suburbs

Thomas M. Stanback Jr.

This chapter examines the way in which the industrial composition and relative earnings of workers are changing in the central cities and suburbs of fourteen large metropolitan areas. 1 Two general findings emerge from the analysis: (1) that large central cities, though differing significantly among themselves, have undergone major transformations leading to increased specialization in services and a marked upgrading of labor force requirements and (2) that the more rapidly growing suburbs of these large metros have become increasingly mature and complex in their industrial structure with many characterized by rapidly developing agglomerations of economic activity. Thus far, however, the suburbs appear to compete only selectively with central cities for higher-order, well-paying service firms and institutions and are characterized by a much larger proportion of lower-wage activities. A major implication of these divergent developmental patterns within large metropolitan areas is that they are creating increasing problems within central cities, where large numbers of poorly educated and unskilled minorities, especially black males, find a dearth of appropriate job openings.


Population Growth and the Importance of Commuting

Population Growth

In the late 1970s, considerable attention was given to what appeared to be a new trend toward dispersion of people and economic activity within the U.S. economy: Population in nonmetropolitan counties taken as a whole had grown more rapidly during the decade than in metropolitan counties (Table 3-1). What went largely unnoticed, however, was that within metropolitan areas suburban counties had grown at a considerably more rapid rate than had nonmetropolitan counties and, among nonmetropolitan areas, it was in those counties in which there was significant commut

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Medical Gridlock and Health Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Eisenhower Center for the Conservation of Human Resources ·Studies in the New Economy· ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: The Changing World of Work 1
  • Notes 14
  • 2: Demographic Trends in the Labor Force 15
  • Notes 32
  • 3: Central Cities and Their Suburbs 33
  • Appendix: The Data 62
  • Appendix: The Data 63
  • 4: Services and Globalization: New York City 65
  • Notes 86
  • 5: Literacy and Work 87
  • References 114
  • 6: The New Immigrants 119
  • Notes 141
  • 7: School to Work: The Integration Principle 145
  • Notes 169
  • Notes 171
  • 8: The Health Sector: Employment Frontier 175
  • Notes 188
  • 9: The Future of Employment Policy 189
  • About the Contributors 203
  • Index 205
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