Statistical Handbook on Consumption and Wealth in the United States

By Chandrika Kaul; Valerie Tomaselli-Moschovitis | Go to book overview

D. Overview of Consumption

GENERAL OVERVIEW

This section presents an overview of household consumption in the United States. It analyzes consumption data from a variety of perspectives. Nearly all tables present detailed categories of consumption (food, housing, apparel, transportation, etc.), while exploring diverse variables, such as consumption across a time series, across household sizes and types, and across race and ethnicity. This multilayered portrait functions as a broad-based backdrop for the more detailed analyses of consumption in later sections.


EXPLANATION OF INDICATORS

D1. Personal Consumption Expenditures in Current and Constant Dollars: The first set of charts and tables examines personal consumption over the course of the current decade, from 1990 through 1996. The data presented include both current expenditure totals, with the effects of inflation factored in (the first chart and next three tables), and constant dollar totals (chained to 1992 dollar valuations), muting the effects of inflation (the following chart and three tables). The charts show summary totals over the time period, while the tables break the totals out into many categories covering such personal expenditures as food, clothing, and housing.

D2. Average Annual Expenditures of All Consumer Units, by Year, 1989-1995: The next set of charts and tables presents detailed data on consumption broken down by year. The first two charts in this grouping present the total number of household units surveyed and the average annual amount of expenditures for those household units. The remaining two tables show the yearly totals, from 1989 to 1991 and from 1992 to 1995.

D3. Average Annual Expenditures of All Consumer Units, by Region, 1995: The next grouping (one chart and three tables) presents a snapshot in time: 1995, mid-decade. It shows average annual household expenditures by regions within the United States. The chart, coming first, shows summary averages for each region, and the tables present averages of all types of expenses. The first table shows detail on food expenses, including such items as cereals, meats, and dairy products; the second table shows detail on household expenses including such items as housing, utilities, and furnishings; the final table shows other types of personal and household expenses, including such items as apparel, transportation, health care, and entertainment.

D4. Average Annual Expenditures of All Consumer Units, by Size of Unit, 1995: The next grouping (one chart and three tables) presents a snapshot in time: 1995, mid-decade. It shows average annual household expenditures, by size of household unit, including one-, two-, three-, four- and over-five-person households. The organization is similar to the previous set. The chart, coming first, shows summary averages for each size of household unit, and the tables present averages of all types of expenses. The first table shows detail on food expenses, including such items as cereals, meats, and dairy products; the second table shows detail on household expenses including such items as housing, utilities, and furnishings; the final table shows other types of personal and household expenses, including such items as apparel, transportation, health care, and entertainment.

D5. Average Annual Expenditures of All Consumer Units, by Tape of Unit, 1995: The next grouping (one chart and three tables) presents a snapshot in time: 1995, mid-decade. It shows average annual household expenditures, by the kind of household unit covered, including households with husband and wife only, husband and wife with children, single parents with children, etc. The organization is similar to the previous set. The chart, coming first, shows summary averages for each kind of household unit, and the tables present averages of all types of expenses. The first table shows detail on food expenses, including such items as cereals,

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Statistical Handbook on Consumption and Wealth in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction v
  • List of Tables and Charts vii
  • A. General Economic Data 1
  • B. Personal, Family, and Household Income and Wealth 22
  • C. Business and Corporate Wealth 77
  • D. Overview of Consumption 97
  • E. Consumption--Material Goods 121
  • F. Consumption-----Services 177
  • G. Consumption--Travel, Leisure, and Other Non-Essentials 215
  • H. the Role of Government 254
  • Appendix: International Perspective 273
  • Index 281
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