The Roman Festivals of the Period of the Republic: An Introduction to the Study of the Religion of the Romans

By W. Warde Fowler | Go to book overview

MENSIS MARTIUS.

THE mensis Martius stands alone among the Roman months. Not only was it the first in matters both civil and religious down to the time of Julius Caesar, but it is more closely associated with a single deity than any other, and that deity the protector and ancestor of the legendary founder of the city. It bears too the name of the god, which is not the case with any other month except January; and it is less certain that January was named after Janus than that March was named after Mars. The cult of Janus is not specially obvious in January except on a single day; but the cult of Mars is paramount all through March, and gives a peculiar character to the month's worship.

It follows on a period which we may call one of purification, or the performance of piacular duties towards dead ancestors and towards the gods; and this has itself succeeded a time of general festivity in the homestead, the group of homesteads, the market, and the cross-roads. The rites of December and January are for the most part festive and social, those of February mystic and melancholy--characteristics which have their counterpart in the Christian Christmas, New Year, and Lent. The rites of March are distinct from those of either period, as we shall see. They again are followed by those of April, the opening month, which are gay and apt to be licentious; then comes the mensis Maius or month of growth, which is a time of peril for the crops, and has a certain character of doubt and darkness in its rites; lastly comes June, the month of maturity, when harvest is close at hand, and life

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The Roman Festivals of the Period of the Republic: An Introduction to the Study of the Religion of the Romans
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • ABBREVIATIONS. xii
  • Mensis Martius. 33
  • Mensis Aprilis. 66
  • Mensis Maius. 98
  • Mensis Iunius. 129
  • Mensis Quinctilis. 173
  • Mensis Sextilis. 189
  • Mensis September. 215
  • Mensis October. 236
  • Mensis November. 252
  • Mensis December 255
  • Mensis Ianuarius. 277
  • Mensis Februarius 298
  • Conclusion 332
  • NOTES ON TWO COINS. 350
  • INDEX OF SUBJECTS 353
  • INDEX OF LATIN WORDS 364
  • INDEX OF LATIN AUTHORS QUOTED 366
  • INDEX OF GREEK AUTHORS QOUTED 372
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