The Roman Festivals of the Period of the Republic: An Introduction to the Study of the Religion of the Romans

By W. Warde Fowler | Go to book overview

NOTES ON TWO COINS.

A. DENARIUS OF P. LICINIUS STOLO (p. 42).

Obv. AVGVSTVS TR POT Augustus, laureate, on horseback to r.

Rev. P. STOLO Helmet (apex) between two shields. IIIVIR

The forms of the helmet and shields are very archaic and interesting, appearing to point to a very early period. The helmet bears a marked likeness to that worn on Egyptian monuments by the Shardana, one of the races that invaded Egypt about the thirteenth century B. C. The shield seems to consist of two small round bosses connected by an oval boss. It is strikingly like the Mycenaean shield as shown on a number of monuments, and far earlier than the so-called Boeotian shield which was common in Greece from the sixth century onwards. The Roman writers themselves seem to have been puzzled by this shape ( Marindin, article "'Salii'" in Smith Dict. Antiq.), and there can be little doubt that it came down from a time when the 'Mycenaean' civilization was common to Greece and Italy.

-350-

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The Roman Festivals of the Period of the Republic: An Introduction to the Study of the Religion of the Romans
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • ABBREVIATIONS. xii
  • Mensis Martius. 33
  • Mensis Aprilis. 66
  • Mensis Maius. 98
  • Mensis Iunius. 129
  • Mensis Quinctilis. 173
  • Mensis Sextilis. 189
  • Mensis September. 215
  • Mensis October. 236
  • Mensis November. 252
  • Mensis December 255
  • Mensis Ianuarius. 277
  • Mensis Februarius 298
  • Conclusion 332
  • NOTES ON TWO COINS. 350
  • INDEX OF SUBJECTS 353
  • INDEX OF LATIN WORDS 364
  • INDEX OF LATIN AUTHORS QUOTED 366
  • INDEX OF GREEK AUTHORS QOUTED 372
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