Everything Is Changing: Contemporary U.S. Movements in Historical Perspective

By Mohammed E. Ahrari | Go to book overview

In view of such strategic disagreements, the pro-Arab groups are destined to encounter a long, hard uphill battle in the American political arena. Until the moderate Arab countries and the United States sort out their strategic disagreements, the pro-Arab groups have no choice but to continue their activities in conventional politics by sustaining their efforts to neutralize negative stereotypes of the Arabs in the American mass media, maintaining their efforts to educate the Americans about their side of the Arab-Israeli conflict and enhancing the American awareness of the intricacies and nuances of Middle East politics.


NOTES

I wish to acknowledge my appreciation to Reba Lewis, Lecturer, Department of Sociology, for critiquing an earlier draft of this article.

1.
Both superpowers seem to perceive each other's strategic dominance in the Middle East as a kind of zero-sum game, where the gains made by one actor at one time would be at the expense of the other.
2.
Robert Trice, "Domestic Interest Groups and the Arab-Israeli conflict: A Behavioral Analysis," in Ethnicity and U.S. Foreign Policy, ed. Abdul Aziz Said ( New York: Praeger, 1977), pp. 117-38.
3.
"U.S. Mideast Arms Policy," in The Middle East, 5th ed. ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1981), p. 65.
4.
Ibid.
5.
James Anderson presented five stages of policy process. The first stage is policy agenda," the second is "policy formulation," the third is "policy adoption," the fourth is "policy implementation," and the fifth is "policy evaluation." James E. Anderson , Public Policymaking, 2d ed. ( New York: Holt, 1979).
6.
A useful definition of "agenda" is provided by Roger Cobb and Charles Elder. According to these authors, agenda is "a set of concrete specific items scheduled for active and serious consideration by a particular decision body," in Participation in America: The Dynamics of Agenda-building ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1974), p. 14.
7.
Ibid., p. 19.
8.
Ibid., pp. 85-86.
9.
John A. Straayer and Robert D. Wrinkle, American Government: Policy, and Non-decisions ( Columbus, Ohio: Charles E. Merrill, 1972), pp. 36-37.
10.
Doris Graber, Mass Media and American Politics ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1980), p. 250.
11
Cobb and Elder, Participation in America, p. 97.
12.
Kenneth Gergen as cited in Cobb and Elder, Participation in America, p. 97.
13.
Ibid., p. 116.
14.
Ibid., pp. 147-50, passim.
15.
Mary Barberis, "The Arab-Israeli Battle on Capitol Hill," The Virginia Quarterly Review 52, no. 2 (Spring 1976):203-23.
16.
"A Potent Effective Force on U. S. Policy," The Middle East, 3d ed. ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1977), pp. 96-101.

-20-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Everything Is Changing: Contemporary U.S. Movements in Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.