Lighting Design on Broadway: Designers and Their Credits, 1915-1990

By Bobbi Owen | Go to book overview

Designers and Their Credits

Lowell Achziger

Lowell Achziger was born in 1949 in Denver, Colorado and received a B.F.A. at Carnegie- Mellon University. A specialist in lighting for film and television, he designed lights for the original off-Broadway production of God- spell. His credits include designs for the McCarter Theatre in Princeton, New Jersey and the Academy Theatre in Lake Forest, Illinois.


Lighting Designs:

1982: Eminent Domain


Mitch Acker

Mitch Acker first designed lighting on Broadway in 1981. He has designed lights for rock concerts, night clubs in Atlantic City, New Jersey, and for the Yarmouth Playhouse in Yarmouth, Massachusetts and the Hollywood Playhouse in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Off-Broadway he designed lights for plays including Live at Crystal Six.


Lighting Designs:

1981: Marlowe


P. Dodd Ackerman

Philip Dodd Ackerman (a.k.a. Ackermann) initially received credit for the scene designs of a Broadway show in 1916, after which his name appeared in numerous playbills during the 1920s and 1930s. His design expertise was generally used for scenery, although he contributed lighting designs to two productions in the late 1920s. He was also the principal designer of P. Dodd Ackerman Scenic Studio.


Lighting Designs:

1927: Honor Be Damned 1929: Hot Chocolates


Scenic Designs:

1916: Any House; Her Soldier Boy; Passing Show of 1916, The; Pay-Day; Robinson Crusoe, Jr. 1917: De Luxe Annie; Furs and Frills; Grass Widow, The 1918: Passing Show of 1918, The 1919: Carnival; Lonely Romeo, A; Take It from Me 1920: Broken Wing, The; Guest of Honor, The; Her Family Tree; Little Miss Charity; Passion Flower, The; Three Live Ghosts 1921: Danger, Ghost Between, The; Nightcap, The; Nobody's Money; Skirt, The; Title, The 1922: Advertising of Kate, The; For Goodness Sake; Frank Fay's Fables; Go Easy, Mabel; Kempy; Rotters, The 1923: Chicken Feed; Ginger, Little Jessie James; Magnolia; Polly Preferred; Stepping Stones; Thumbs Down; Wasp, The 1924: Alloy; Betty Lee; Conscience; Lady Killer, The; My Girl; Pigs; Sitting Pretty; Stepping Stones 1925: Alias the Deacon; All Dressed Up; Green Hat, The; Kiss in a Taxi, A; Merry, Merry; No, No Nanette; Pelican, The; Piker, The 1926: 2 Girls Wanted; Castles in the Air; Climax, The; Ghost Train, The; Girl Friend, The; Twinkle, Twinkle; Up the Line; Weak Woman, A; What's the Big Idea; Woman Disputed, The 1927: Barker, The; Crime; Excess Baggage; Half a Widow, Honor Be Damned; It Is to Laugh; Just Fancy; Kempy; Lady Alone; Lost; Madame X; My Princess; Sinner, Spring Board, The; Trial of Mary Dugan; Window Panes 1928: Caravan; Crashing Through; Cross MyHeart

-3-

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Lighting Design on Broadway: Designers and Their Credits, 1915-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Designers and Their Credits 3
  • Appendix 1: The Tony Awards 105
  • Appendix 2: The Maharam Awards 109
  • Appendix 3: The American Theatre Wing Design Awards 111
  • Selected Bibliography 113
  • Index of Plays 115
  • About the Author 161
  • Recent Titles in Bibliographies and Indexes in the Performing Arts 163
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