Latin American Urbanization: Historical Profiles of Major Cities

By Gerald Michael Greenfield | Go to book overview

ber of people who were displaced by the civil war, along with high rates of natural increase, it seems likely that the actual population of the city in the early 1990s may be considerably higher than these estimates.


NOTES
1.
The border between El Salvador and Honduras was disputed from the time of independence and remained so in the late 1980s, as the matter was being arbitrated by the International Court of Justice (Day 1987:425). Thus, figures for the area of the two countries differ slightly, depending on which claims are used to draw the boundaries.
2.
The most recent census in El Salvador was in 1971. A new census, the first in more than twenty years, was planned for early 1992 but has not yet been taken.
3.
See MacLeod 1973, chapters 5 and 10, and maps, 236-239; Pérez Brignoli 1989, map 6, 41.
4.
The number of displaced persons within the country was put at 467,366 in 1984 ( Montes 1986:40) and at 750,000 in 1986 ( Lungo Uclés 1987:11).
5.
Estimates vary wildly. For example, the Europa World Yearbook lists the population of the three largest cities in 1985 as: San Salvador, 462,652 (city only?); Santa Ana, 224,302; San Miguel, 175,553, while the Statesman's Year-Book gives the populations of these cities for the same year as 972,810 (metropolitan area?); 208,322; and 161,156, and the official government estimate of San Salvador metropolitan area population for 1986 is over 1.2 million (see Table 10.2). It is likely that all of these sources underestimate the actual population of these cities.

REFERENCES

Adams Richard N. 1957. Cultural Surveys of Panama, Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras. Washington, DC: Pan American Sanitary Bureau, Publicaciones Científicas No. 33.

Anderson Thomas. 1971. Matanza: El Salvador's Communist Revolt of 1932. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Barón Rodolfo Castro. 1942. La población de El Salvador. Madrid: "Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Instituto Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo".

-----. 1950. Reseña histórica de la Villa de San Salvador: desde su fundación en 1525 hasta que recibe el título de ciudad en 1546. Madrid: "Ediciones Cultura Hispánica".

Barry Tom. 1990. El Salvador. A Country Guide. Albuquerque: Interhemispheric Education Resource Center.

Browning David. 1971. El Salvador. Landscape and Society. London: Oxford University Press.

Chamberlain Robert S. 1947. "The Early Years of San Miguel de la Frontera". Hispanic American Historical Review 27:623-646.

Cortés y Pedro Larraz. 1958. "Descripción geográfico-moral de la diocesis de Goathemala". In Biblioteca "Goathemala," Vol. 20. Guatemala City: Sociedad de Geografía e Historia de Guatemala.

-270-

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Latin American Urbanization: Historical Profiles of Major Cities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • 1: ARGENTINA 1
  • Introduction 1
  • Bibliography 37
  • 2: BOLIVIA 39
  • Introduction 39
  • Notes 60
  • References 60
  • 3: BRAZIL 62
  • Introduction 62
  • Note 104
  • References 104
  • 4: CHILE 106
  • Introduction 106
  • Notes 131
  • References 131
  • 5 - COLOMBIA 134
  • Introduction 134
  • Note 157
  • References 157
  • 6: COSTA RICA 159
  • Introduction 159
  • Note 171
  • References 171
  • 7: CUBA 173
  • Introduction 173
  • References 186
  • 8: DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 188
  • Introduction 188
  • Note 213
  • Bibliography 214
  • 9: ECUADOR 215
  • Introduction 215
  • References 249
  • 10: EL SALVADOR 252
  • Introduction 252
  • Notes 270
  • References 270
  • 11: GUATEMALA 273
  • Introduction 273
  • Notes 290
  • References 291
  • 12: HAITI 294
  • Introduction 294
  • Note 311
  • References 311
  • 13: HONDURAS 313
  • Introduction 313
  • References 328
  • 14: JAMAICA 331
  • Introduction 331
  • References 347
  • 15: MEXICO 350
  • Introduction 350
  • References 391
  • 16: NICARAGUA 396
  • Introduction 396
  • References 414
  • 17: PANAMA 416
  • Introduction 416
  • Note 425
  • Bibliography 425
  • 18 - PARAGUAY 427
  • Introduction 427
  • Bibliography 444
  • 19: PERU 446
  • Introduction 446
  • Note 466
  • References 466
  • 20: URUGUAY 468
  • Introduction 468
  • Bibliography 484
  • 21: VENEZUELA 486
  • Introduction 486
  • Note 508
  • References 508
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 511
  • Index 517
  • ABOUT THE EDITOR AND CONTRIBUTORS 533
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