Latin American Urbanization: Historical Profiles of Major Cities

By Gerald Michael Greenfield | Go to book overview

only marginally employed in the underproductive urban service sector. Street vendors, borlette (local game of chance) operators, day laborers, domestics, cooked food purveyors, and similar occupations produce such low earnings that workers cannot accumulate any capital. Construction, government employment, and the slowly growing jobs in manufacturing, on the other hand, create an urban labor force with sufficient incomes to afford better housing and create markets for other goods and services. Better urban infrastructure in turn would encourage private entrepreneurs to invest in businesses that have higher-paying jobs. The longer such programs are delayed, the more deeply Haiti and Port-au-Prince will sink into the abyss of the vicious circle of poverty. This grim prospect becomes especially chilling in view of the fact that Port-au-Prince has a population growth rate that is four times that of the nation as a whole. Indeed, Port-au-Prince has many urban crises that need immediate or short-term solutions.


NOTE
1.
Haitian leaders set up a territorial division of the republic that was patterned after France, which combined plantations and farms into communes; several communes were combined into arrondisements, basically, military districts with a general appointed by the president in charge. This official has both military and civil functions. The administrative link between arrondisement and the capital is the main channel for all political functions. However, even the smallest rural areas, called sections, are administered by a chef-de-section, who is appointed by, and reports to, the central government. Departments are combinations of arrondisements, but their functional importance is minimal.

REFERENCES

Brinkerhoff Derick W., and Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor, eds. 1986. Politics, Projects, and People: International Development in Haiti. New York: Praeger.

Fass Simon M. 1978. "Port-au-Prince: Awakening to the Urban Crisis". In Latin American Urban Research, vol. 6, Metropolitan Latin America: The Challenge and the Response, 155-180, ed. Wayne A. Cornelius and Robert V. Kemper . Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

-----. 1986. "The St. Martin Project: A Decade of Pain and Progress in the Evolution of an Urban Development Institution". In Politics, Projects, and People: Institutional Development in Haiti, 231-255, ed. Derick W. Brinkerhoff and Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor. New York: Praeger.

-----. 1987. "Housing the Ultra-Poor: Theory and Practice in Haiti". Journal of the American Planning Association 53, no. 2 (Spring): 193-205.

Foster Charles R., and Albert Valdman, eds. 1984. Haiti Today and Tomorrow: An Interdisciplinary Study. Lanham, MD: University Press of America.

Heinl Robert D., Jr., and Nancy G. Heinl. 1978. Written in Blood: The Story of the Haitian People. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

-311-

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Latin American Urbanization: Historical Profiles of Major Cities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • 1: ARGENTINA 1
  • Introduction 1
  • Bibliography 37
  • 2: BOLIVIA 39
  • Introduction 39
  • Notes 60
  • References 60
  • 3: BRAZIL 62
  • Introduction 62
  • Note 104
  • References 104
  • 4: CHILE 106
  • Introduction 106
  • Notes 131
  • References 131
  • 5 - COLOMBIA 134
  • Introduction 134
  • Note 157
  • References 157
  • 6: COSTA RICA 159
  • Introduction 159
  • Note 171
  • References 171
  • 7: CUBA 173
  • Introduction 173
  • References 186
  • 8: DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 188
  • Introduction 188
  • Note 213
  • Bibliography 214
  • 9: ECUADOR 215
  • Introduction 215
  • References 249
  • 10: EL SALVADOR 252
  • Introduction 252
  • Notes 270
  • References 270
  • 11: GUATEMALA 273
  • Introduction 273
  • Notes 290
  • References 291
  • 12: HAITI 294
  • Introduction 294
  • Note 311
  • References 311
  • 13: HONDURAS 313
  • Introduction 313
  • References 328
  • 14: JAMAICA 331
  • Introduction 331
  • References 347
  • 15: MEXICO 350
  • Introduction 350
  • References 391
  • 16: NICARAGUA 396
  • Introduction 396
  • References 414
  • 17: PANAMA 416
  • Introduction 416
  • Note 425
  • Bibliography 425
  • 18 - PARAGUAY 427
  • Introduction 427
  • Bibliography 444
  • 19: PERU 446
  • Introduction 446
  • Note 466
  • References 466
  • 20: URUGUAY 468
  • Introduction 468
  • Bibliography 484
  • 21: VENEZUELA 486
  • Introduction 486
  • Note 508
  • References 508
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 511
  • Index 517
  • ABOUT THE EDITOR AND CONTRIBUTORS 533
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