Latin American Urbanization: Historical Profiles of Major Cities

By Gerald Michael Greenfield | Go to book overview

percent of the nation's population. Today, that share is somewhat lower, in part because of a lower birthrate in Montevideo than for the country as a whole and because the bulk of emigration from Uruguay has originated in the capital city. Hence, metropolitan Montevideo may represent only 40- 42 percent of the national total.

Despite this growth, Montevideo's basic morphology remains largely unchanged from what was outlined in the trolley and railroad period. In 1945 the British streetcar system that served these areas was purchased by the municipal government and converted to buses. In 1947 the British waterworks were nationalized. The shape of the metropolitan area continues to be characterized by linearity in the districts beyond the more densely populated city core. Now part of the higher-density core, the old eastern beach enclaves--Pocitos, Buceo, Malvin, and others--remain favored residential districts. They reflect the continued attraction of growth eastward along the axis of the Ruta Interbalnearia. To the north, colonial villages like Pando and Las Piedras, as well as nineteenth-century railroad towns, have also become functioning parts of Gran Montevideo. Economic hardship beyond the metropolitan area has also functionally incorporated more distant centers into the metro system. The closing of most of the marble quarries at Minas in 1982, for instance, necessitates long journeys to work into Gran Montevideo or the flourishing towns of the Ruta Interbalnearia. Lower- income neighborhoods are most common to the northwest of the city core, and since the mid-1940s pockets of squatter settlements, or cantegriles (an expression of the growing housing crisis), have appeared within, and at the periphery of, already established neighborhoods in response to rural-to- urban migration.

Nonetheless, Montevideo remains a vibrant city of lively streets and pleasing barrios, of attractive beaches and friendly residents. As always, Montevideo continues to function much like a "city-state," providing Uruguay with economic and cultural opportunities that an urban system composed of a more balanced hierarchy of towns and cities would be unable to offer. For Uruguay, the primacy of Montevideo continues to favor national development.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Aljanati Daniel et al. 1979. Los Departamentos. Montevideo: Editorial "Nuestra Tierra."

Altezor Carlos, and Hugo Baracchini. 1971. Historia urbanística y edilicia de la ciudad de Montevideo: Desde su fundación colonial hasta nuestros dias. Montevideo: Biblioteca José Artigas.

Alvarez Ricardo Lenzi. 1986. Fundación de poblados en el Uruguay. Montevideo: Universidad de la República, Instituto de Historia de la Arquitectura.

Arana Mariano. 1983. Algunas consideraciones sobre las áreas costeras en el Uru-

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Latin American Urbanization: Historical Profiles of Major Cities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • 1: ARGENTINA 1
  • Introduction 1
  • Bibliography 37
  • 2: BOLIVIA 39
  • Introduction 39
  • Notes 60
  • References 60
  • 3: BRAZIL 62
  • Introduction 62
  • Note 104
  • References 104
  • 4: CHILE 106
  • Introduction 106
  • Notes 131
  • References 131
  • 5 - COLOMBIA 134
  • Introduction 134
  • Note 157
  • References 157
  • 6: COSTA RICA 159
  • Introduction 159
  • Note 171
  • References 171
  • 7: CUBA 173
  • Introduction 173
  • References 186
  • 8: DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 188
  • Introduction 188
  • Note 213
  • Bibliography 214
  • 9: ECUADOR 215
  • Introduction 215
  • References 249
  • 10: EL SALVADOR 252
  • Introduction 252
  • Notes 270
  • References 270
  • 11: GUATEMALA 273
  • Introduction 273
  • Notes 290
  • References 291
  • 12: HAITI 294
  • Introduction 294
  • Note 311
  • References 311
  • 13: HONDURAS 313
  • Introduction 313
  • References 328
  • 14: JAMAICA 331
  • Introduction 331
  • References 347
  • 15: MEXICO 350
  • Introduction 350
  • References 391
  • 16: NICARAGUA 396
  • Introduction 396
  • References 414
  • 17: PANAMA 416
  • Introduction 416
  • Note 425
  • Bibliography 425
  • 18 - PARAGUAY 427
  • Introduction 427
  • Bibliography 444
  • 19: PERU 446
  • Introduction 446
  • Note 466
  • References 466
  • 20: URUGUAY 468
  • Introduction 468
  • Bibliography 484
  • 21: VENEZUELA 486
  • Introduction 486
  • Note 508
  • References 508
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 511
  • Index 517
  • ABOUT THE EDITOR AND CONTRIBUTORS 533
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