The American Fund for Public Service: Charles Garland and Radical Philanthropy, 1922-1941

By Gloria Garrett Samson | Go to book overview

5
Workers Will Lay Down Their Tools

Baldwin was delighted to hear that Garland's wife had returned to him (in late April 1922, after the birth of their son), but he became vexed as he continued to receive no reply from Frances Perkins regarding her invitation to join the new board of directors. The New York secretary of state added to his irritation, hindering the incorporation of the fund by vetoing name after proposed name for no apparent reason. 1

Baldwin notified the waiting directors of the difficulties involved "because of technical objections raised by the Secretary of State and the refusal of the Supreme Court judge now sitting to approve a new form of incorporation." In mid-May he wrote to "Charlie" to tell him that "it is to be known by the high-sounding title of the American Fund for Public Service, Inc." The directors, he said, "are all persons of wide contact, a practical point-of-view and with a knowledge of how best to promote the cause of freedom in the way you and I understand it." Garland's money made it possible. "We hope to add to it later but the real impetus will come from you." 2

While waiting to get the operations of the fund started, Baldwin wrote to the Carnegie, Rockefeller, and Russell Sage Foundations asking for examples of their applications, forms for investigating applicants, and by- laws. For an organization that intended to challenge the status quo, approaching those foundations that "were dominated by class interests," according to both Samuel Gompers and sociologist E. A. Ross, seemed particularly unimaginative. 3 However, no leftist philanthropical models existed; thus, in the interest of time, Baldwin sought information from those very institutions whose dominance in research and charity he hoped to counteract.

A. Philip Randolph did not wait for operations to begin before he applied for assistance to the Messenger. On an ad hoc form that Baldwin seems to have devised--titled "Schedule of Information from Applicants"--Randolph supplied information regarding the purpose, size, and financial basis of his enterprise. In reply to the question, "Is the organization engaged in

-27-

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The American Fund for Public Service: Charles Garland and Radical Philanthropy, 1922-1941
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Labor Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - An Inheritance Rejected 1
  • Notes 3
  • 2 - From Progressivism to Radicalism 5
  • Notes 12
  • 3 - The Aclu and a New Social Order 15
  • Notes 18
  • 4 - Free from the Bonds of Old Institutions 19
  • Notes 24
  • 5 - Workers Will Lay Down Their Tools 27
  • Notes 31
  • 6 - To Promote the Well-Being of Mankind 33
  • Notes 38
  • 7 - Pacifists as Radicals 41
  • Notes 46
  • 8 - It Takes Warm Hearts 49
  • Notes 56
  • 9 - Chosen to Box the Left Compass 59
  • Notes 63
  • 10 - A Sane Enough Radicalism 65
  • Notes 68
  • 11 - Spend It Here and Now 69
  • Notes 73
  • 12 - Scientific, Pragmatic, Efficient 75
  • Notes 81
  • 13 - Emancipation of Their Class in Every Sphere 83
  • Notes 90
  • 14 - Bolsheviks in Patriots' Clothing 93
  • Notes 100
  • 15 - Tempers Flare 103
  • Notes 109
  • 16 - The Rebel Girl Comes Aboard 111
  • Notes 115
  • 17 - Surveying the Left 117
  • Notes 122
  • 18 - Enemies on the Left 125
  • Notes 131
  • 19 - Education and Culture 133
  • Notes 139
  • 20 - Recipient Testimonials 141
  • Notes 147
  • 21 - Negro Work"" 149
  • Notes 155
  • 22 - Passaic 157
  • Notes 162
  • 23 - Vanguard Press 165
  • Notes 169
  • 24 - Friction Within and Without 171
  • Notes 177
  • 25 - Little Left to Repress 179
  • Notes 190
  • 26 - The Manifold Discriminations That Beset Him"" 193
  • Notes 201
  • 27 - Shift to Low Gear 205
  • Notes 216
  • 28 - We Did Quite a Lot of Good 219
  • Notes 224
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 253
  • About the Author 265
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