Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship

By Angelica Redleaf; Susan A. Baird | Go to book overview

13 Safe Practice Analysis

PURPOSE: To determine whether and to what degree we and our staff may be insensitive, improper, or harmful in the care of patients.


WHAT IS THE SAFE PRACTICE ANALYSIS?

It is human nature to see what we want to see and to hear what we want to hear, and all of us have blind spots. Those are the reasons for the Safe Practice Analysis. It goes beyond the practitioner, asking staff, patients, and perhaps colleagues to also join in evaluating the practice. It asks important questions about patient care, about the doctor and staff, and about the general office environment. This analysis includes:


A Risk Factor Analysis

The Sexual Misconduct Risk Factor Analysis (RFA) poses specific questions about doctor attitudes and behaviors.

It can be self-scored, it requires little interpretation, and it can be kept private. The results give a practitioner a quick self-assessment of his or her current risk level for sexual misconduct, and can help to identify some of the riskiest behaviors.

The RFA can be used independently of the rest of the Safe Practice Assessment--but it is only a tool. Like any tool, it is--at best--only as good as the knowledge and skills of its user. The RFA requires both insight and honesty, it cannot see around the blind spots that each of us has, and it cannot detect the many risky behaviors that it does not specifically mention.

The RFA can be used as a periodic evaluation, to pinpoint times when your risk is particularly high, or it can be used together with the Practice Evaluation Questionnaires as part of the Safe Practice Analysis.

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Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • PART I Gender, Sexuality, and Touch 1
  • 1: Gender 3
  • Notes 29
  • 2: Sexuality 33
  • 3: Touch 43
  • 4: Explorations and Applications 53
  • PART II Sexual Misconduct 61
  • 5: What Is Misconduct? 63
  • 6: HOW Misconduct Occurs 71
  • 7: Caring for the Abused Patient 87
  • 8: Boundaries and Consent 91
  • 9: The Doctor Role 97
  • 10: What Is the Solution? 105
  • PART III Patient Protection Protocol 109
  • 12: Safe Practice Strategies 115
  • 13: Safe Practice Analysis 127
  • 14: Making Changes 161
  • 15: Defusing Sexual Attractions 169
  • PART IV Review 175
  • --16-- Six Factors for Safe Practice 177
  • 17: The New Patnership 183
  • Bibliography 185
  • Recommended Reading 191
  • Recommended Viewing 195
  • Index 199
  • About the Authors 213
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