Conducting Educational Research: A Comparative View

By R. Murray Thomas | Go to book overview

Tables and Figures
Tables
1-1 Levels of Precision15
1-2 Average Science Test Scores in Four Counties16
1-3 Two Forms of Research Reports: Theses and Journal Articles24
8-1 Stages in the Evolution of Schools' Approaches to Instruction189
9-1 Kinds of Data and Correlation Procedures207
10-1 Moral Values in Textbooks--Taiwan and Indonesia224
10-2 World Regions' Illiteracy Rates and Per-Inhabitant Expenditures224
10-3 Average Math Test Scores in Two School Districts225
Figures
1-1 Trends in Average Science Test Scores in Four Counties17
1-2 Science Score Distributions--Domingo County 1977-199717
2-1 A Framework for Comparative Education Analyses31
5-1 Pretest-Treatment-Posttest Design112
5-2 Interrupted-Time-Series Design113
6-1 Relation of the Observer to the Observed141
6-2 Two Types of Rating Scales145
7-1 Mothers' Styles of Interacting with Preschoolers165
7-2 Ability Compared with Performance166
7-3 Recommended Committee Composition167
7-4 Discrete Items Representing Successive Degrees168
9-1 Pie Charts for Displaying Percentages194
9-2 Distributions of Reading-Test Scores in Three Rural Schools196
9-3 Distance-Between-Percentiles as a Measure of Variability201
9-4 Students' Scores in a Dart Game203
9-5 Standard Deviations and the Normal Curve204
9-6 Normal and Skewed Distributions205

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conducting Educational Research: A Comparative View
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.