Mapping the Cultural Space of Journalism: How Journalists Distinguish News from Entertainment

By Samuel P. Winch | Go to book overview

7
Conclusions

When the goal is expansion of authority or expertise into domains claimed by other professions or occupations, boundary-work heightens the contrast between rivals in ways flattering to the ideologists' side; when the goal is monopolization of professional authority and resources, boundary-work excludes rivals from within by defining them as outsiders with labels such as "pseudo," "deviant," or "amateur"; when the goal is protection of autonomy over professional activities, boundary-work exempts members from responsibility for consequences of their work by putting blame on scapegoats from outside.

-- Thomas F. Gieryn

"Boundary-work and the demarcation of science from non-science"


A REEXAMINATION OF CHAPTERS 3, 4, 5, AND 6

Chapter 3--The Evolution of Television Journalism, the First Two Decades

Early television journalism could not help being influenced by its medium, a medium that evidently looked like a great teaching tool to the first naïve observers. To those who held the purse strings--and who controlled television programming--television appeared to be the greatest advertising medium of all time. Soon, it became a requirement that all television programming be designed to draw the largest possible audience. This quest for profits put pressures on television journalists to adopt techniques that seemed less than faithful to the truth and less than faithful to the traditions of journalism, in some critics' opinions.

Television journalism began as a field in which few journalists

-149-

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Mapping the Cultural Space of Journalism: How Journalists Distinguish News from Entertainment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Cultural Space of Journalism 1
  • Introduction 1
  • Summary 10
  • Note 11
  • 2 - The Boundary-Work Approach 13
  • 3 - The Evolution of Television News: Growing Up in an Entertainment Medium 27
  • Introduction 27
  • Conclusions 69
  • 4 - Mission Impossible? When Government Tries to Map the Boundaries of Journalism 73
  • Conclusions 92
  • Notes 94
  • 5 - Protecting the Cultural Authority of Journalism by Sanctioning Deviance 95
  • Introduction 95
  • Conclusions 110
  • Notes 112
  • 6 - The Clinton and Flowers Story: Too Good to Pass Up 113
  • Introduction 113
  • Summary 143
  • Notes 146
  • 7 - Conclusions 149
  • References 167
  • Index 185
  • About the Author 189
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