Sterilization of People with Mental Disabilities: Issues, Perspectives, and Cases

By Ellen Brantlinger | Go to book overview

8
Professionals' Attitudes toward the Sterilization of MR Individuals

Social upheavals and legislative trends, such as those pertaining to institutionalization and sterilization, reveal that social constructs and collective attitudes are not static, but shift and evolve with time. In spite of historical trends and patterns in mass sentiments, it is likely that movements and ideologies are never universally endorsed or rejected. Ideas live on in individuals. Attitudes and habits of practice vary according to geographical location, professional role, political affiliation, gender, educational attainment, religion, or any number of idiosyncratic variables such as contact with MR people.

People with disabilities are frequently in the position of having family members and/or professionals make decisions for them. These others, then, have the power to significantly influence MR people's lives. Although family tends to be perceived as subjective, the status of professional connotes an objective and informed expertise. Yet professionals may be equally influenced by perceptions, attitudes, beliefs, and circumstances. Physicians as a group are "generally in favor of sterilizing developmentally disabled individuals" ( Haavik & Menninger, 1981, p. 113); that is, they have a bias. The chief argument against medical professionals as principal decision makers is that people overestimate their knowledge of patients' interests and values and they confuse medical judgments with moral decisions for which physicians possess no special credentials ( Buchanan & Brock, 1989). The result is that professionals may make decisions for clients that are neither consistent with clients' values nor in their best interests.

This chapter reports a study of the attitudes of people in various professional fields toward sexuality, sterilization, and MR people. The participants were 50 professionals, including family planning clinic employees, social

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sterilization of People with Mental Disabilities: Issues, Perspectives, and Cases
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.