Lawyers v. Educators: Black Colleges and Desegregation in Public Higher Education

By Jean L. Preer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This work has benefited in many ways from the support and assistance of colleagues, friends, and family. My experience as a Woodrow Wilson Foundation Teaching Intern at Federal City College enriched my life and influenced my decision to write about black higher education. George Washington University furnished financial support for my research as did my parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. Lyon. The Institute on Desegregation at North Carolina Central University sponsored a conference in 1979 on The Impact of Desegregation on Higher Education at which I first tested some of the themes developed in this book. I wish to thank the editors of the North Carolina Central Law Journal for permission to use material originally published as Preer, "Lawyers v. Educators: Changing Perceptions of Desegregation in Public Higher Education," 11 North Carolina Central Law Journal 74 ( 1979).

For his sustained interest, careful attention, and provocative criticism through many versions of this work, I am grateful to Arthur Selwyn Miller. For enabling me to apply my legal training to the study of American Civilization and for his continuing encouragement, I am indebted to Robert H. Walker, Jr. For their helpful suggestions and assistance, I wish to thank John A. Morgan, Jr., Howard F. Gillette, Jr., and Kenneth S. Tollett.

For making available materials, I wish to thank the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education, the law firm of Rauh, Silard and Lichtman, the Office for Civil Rights of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the Association of American Law Schools, the Institute for Services to Education, and the Institute for the Study of Educational Policy. My perspective has been enlarged by conversations and correspondence with educators and lawyers concerned with desegregation in higher education. I thank them for sharing their time and insights with me and apologize for the inevitable shortcomings which are wholly mine.

This work is dedicated to my husband, James R. Preer. It was undertaken with his encouragement and could not have been completed without his help. For his unfailing support, quiet criticism, and endless patience, I am profoundly grateful.

-vii-

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Lawyers v. Educators: Black Colleges and Desegregation in Public Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in American Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 4
  • 1 - The Morrill Act of 1890: Separate Black Public Colleges 5
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Gaines: Equal Access or Equal Opportunity? 31
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - Sipuel: Arguments in Transition 63
  • Notes 88
  • 4 - Sweatt: Dubious Precedent 95
  • Notes 121
  • 5 - Hawkins: Conditions That Now Prevail 127
  • Notes 152
  • 6 - The Civil Rights Act of 1964: from Segregation to Discrimination 157
  • Notes 183
  • 7 - Adams: Racial Identifiability and Black Public Colleges 189
  • Notes 222
  • Conclusion 233
  • Notes 241
  • List of Cases and Statutes 243
  • Bibliography 247
  • Index 271
  • About the Author 279
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