Lawyers v. Educators: Black Colleges and Desegregation in Public Higher Education

By Jean L. Preer | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Books

Ashmore Harry S. The Negro and the Schools. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1954.

Auerbach Jerold S. Unequal Justice: Lawyers and Social Change in Modern America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976.

Blaustein Albert P., and Ferguson Clarence Clyde Jr. Desegregation and the Law: The Meaning and Effect of the School Segregation Cases. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1957.

Bond Horace Mann. The Education of the Negro in the American Social Order. 1934. Reprint. New York: Octagon Books, 1966.

Bowles Frank, and DeCosta Frank. Between Two Worlds: A Profile of Negro Higher Education. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1971.

Boyd William M., II. Desegregating America's Colleges: A Nationwide Survey of Black Students, 1972-73. New York: Praeger, 1974.

Bullock Henry Allen. A History of Negro Education in the South. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1967.

Carmichael Stokely, and Hamilton Charles V. Black Power. The Politics of Liberation in America. New York: Vintage Books, 1967.

Clift Virgil A., Anderson Archibald W., and Hullfish H. Gordon, eds. Negro Education in America: Its Adequacy, Problems and Needs. New York: Harper & Row, 1962.

Coleman James S. Equality of Educational Opportunity. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1966.

Conrad Earl. Jim Crow America. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1947.

Cross George Lynn. Blacks in White Colleges: Oklahoma's Landmark Cases. Norman, Okla.: University of Oklahoma Press, 1975.

Du W. E.B. Bois The Education of Black People: Ten Critiques, 1906-1960. Edited by Herbert Aptheker. Amherst, Mass.: University of Massachusetts Press, 1973.

Dworkin Ronald. Taking Rights Seriously. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1977.

Eddy Edward Danforth Jr. Colleges for Our Land and Time: The Land-Grant Idea in American Education. 1957. Reprint. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1973.

Embree Edwin R. Brown Americans: The Story of a Tenth of the Nation. New York: Viking Press, 1943.

Franklin John Hope. From Slavery to Freedom. 3rd ed. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1966.

Friedman Leon, ed. Argument: The Oral Argument Before the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 1952-1955. New York: Chelsea House, 1969.

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lawyers v. Educators: Black Colleges and Desegregation in Public Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in American Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 4
  • 1 - The Morrill Act of 1890: Separate Black Public Colleges 5
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Gaines: Equal Access or Equal Opportunity? 31
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - Sipuel: Arguments in Transition 63
  • Notes 88
  • 4 - Sweatt: Dubious Precedent 95
  • Notes 121
  • 5 - Hawkins: Conditions That Now Prevail 127
  • Notes 152
  • 6 - The Civil Rights Act of 1964: from Segregation to Discrimination 157
  • Notes 183
  • 7 - Adams: Racial Identifiability and Black Public Colleges 189
  • Notes 222
  • Conclusion 233
  • Notes 241
  • List of Cases and Statutes 243
  • Bibliography 247
  • Index 271
  • About the Author 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 282

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.