Understanding United States Government Growth: An Empirical Analysis of the Postwar Era

By William D. Berry; David Lowery | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

William D. Berry received his Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota in 1980 and is currently Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Kentucky. His areas of specialization are public policy, political economy, and research methodology. He has recently been involved in studies of government regulation, public sector growth, and budgeting. Professor Berry has published numerous papers in scholarly journals such as Journal of Politics and American Journal of Political Science and is on the editorial board of the latter. He is also author of Multiple Regression in Practice, Nonrecursive Causal Models, and coeditor of New Tools for Social Scientists: Applications and Advances in Research Methods.

David Lowery received his Ph.D. at Michigan State University in 1981 and is currently Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has also served as policy analyst with the Michigan Department of Treasury and was chief legislative aide to the Committee on Taxation of the Michigan House of Representatives. His primary work has been on the politics of public finance and administrative politics. Professor Lowery has published numerous articles on these topics in such scholarly journals as American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, American Journal of Political Science, Western Political Quarterly, and Social Science Quarterly.

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Understanding United States Government Growth: An Empirical Analysis of the Postwar Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • List of Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • I GOVERNMENT GROWTH: MEASUREMENT, CONSEQUENCES AND CAUSES 1
  • I the Problem of Government Growth 3
  • 2: MEASURING THE SIZE AND GROWTH OF GOVERNMENT 15
  • II: GOVERNMENT GROWTH 37
  • 3: EXPLANATIONS OF GOVERNMENT GROWTH 39
  • 4: TESTING THE EXPLANATIONS 65
  • III A DISAGGREGATED ANALYSIS OF GOVERNMENT GRONWH 95
  • 5: GROWTH IN THE COST OF GOVERNMENT 97
  • 6: GROWTH IN THE SCOPE OF GOVERNMENT PURCHASES 114
  • 7: GROWTH IN THE SCOPE OF GOVERNMENT TRANSFERS 156
  • IV TOWARD A GREATER UNDERSTANDING OF GOVERNMENT GROWTH 179
  • 8: GOVERNMENT GROWTH 181
  • Bibliography 191
  • Index 207
  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS 213
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