American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

Preface

American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930 is the second of a series of three books providing salient facts about resident acting companies in the United States. Until about 1870, stock companies produced most of the plays seen in theatres of the United States. The stock company of the period covered in Book I, American Theatre Companies, 1749-1887, was an autonomous organization located permanently in a city large enough to support it (sometimes several of its kind) for a winter season lasting as long as forty weeks. The manager of the company leased or owned the theatre and hired at least a small corps of actors and actresses for season-long engagements. The stock-company manager selected a repertory of plays to suit local tastes and to capitalize on the strength of his company of players. Though brief runs of new plays were fairly common, stock companies typically produced a different full-length play and a short afterpiece each night. Permanent stock companies such as the Park Theatre Company in New York and the Boston Museum Company occupied the first rank in the theatrical realm. They produced the newest plays seen in the United States for the highest class of theatrical patrons. Traveling stock companies were common, as were second- class permanent companies in the largest cities. Permanent companies of the second class offered cut-rate prices to a lower-class clientele. They could offer discounts, or "popular prices," because managers picked up performers who would work for wages below the professional average or rented older theatres at reduced rates. The second-class companies were often short-lived. By 1870, the economic advantages of the single-play company had contributed to the dissolution of all but a few of the permanent stock companies of all classes. Moreover, the few first-class companies remaining intact adhered less frequently to the repertory pattern of playing and tried more often to produce long-run hits. American Theatre Companies, 1749-1887 contains eighty-one biographies of these eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American stock companies.

-vii-

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American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Bibliography 8
  • Bibliography 13
  • Bibliography 22
  • Bibliography 24
  • Bibliography 27
  • Bibliography 31
  • Bibliography 36
  • Bibliography 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • B 41
  • Bibliography 51
  • Bibliography 55
  • Bibliography 61
  • Bibliography 63
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 72
  • C 73
  • Bibliography 80
  • Bibliography 86
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bibliography 94
  • Bibliography 97
  • D 99
  • Bibliography 103
  • Bibliography 111
  • Bibliography 118
  • Bibliography 126
  • Bibliography 134
  • Bibliography 140
  • Bibliography 145
  • Bibliography 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Bibliography 158
  • E 159
  • F 165
  • Bibliography 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • G 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Bibliography 188
  • Bibliography 190
  • Bibliography 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • H 205
  • Bibliography 208
  • Bibliography 210
  • Bibliography 212
  • Bibliography 220
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Bibliography 231
  • I 233
  • PERSONNEL 237
  • J 239
  • Bibliography 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • K 245
  • Bibliography 247
  • L 249
  • Bibliography 253
  • Bibliography 260
  • Bibliography 262
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 276
  • M 277
  • Bibliography 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Bibliography 284
  • Bibliography 289
  • Bibliography 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Bibliography 300
  • Bibliography 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • N 311
  • Bibliography 317
  • Bibliography 322
  • Bibliography 325
  • Bibliography 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • Bibliography 338
  • O 341
  • Bibliography 346
  • Bibliography 348
  • P 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Bibliography 358
  • Bibliography 363
  • Bibliography 367
  • Bibliography 370
  • Bibliography 377
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 391
  • R 393
  • Bibliography 396
  • Bibliography 399
  • Bibliography 402
  • Bibliography 404
  • S 405
  • Bibliography 407
  • Bibliography 411
  • Bibliography 413
  • Bibliography 416
  • Bibliography 424
  • Bibliography 428
  • Bibliography 432
  • T 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • U 443
  • Bibliography 447
  • V 449
  • Bibliography 453
  • W 455
  • Bibliography 460
  • Bibliography 463
  • Bibliography 470
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 478
  • Bibliography 482
  • Bibliography 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Y 489
  • Bibliography 492
  • APPENDIX I CHRONOLOGY OF THEATRE COMPANIES 493
  • APPENDIX II THEATRE COMPANIES BY STATE 497
  • Index of Personal Names and Play Titles 501
  • About the Contributors 535
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