American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

Uncle Tom's Cabin, The Blue Mouse, Zaza, The Dancing Girl, Thelma, In Mizzoura, The Resurrection.

1911-12: The Count of Monte Cristo, Three Weeks, Carmen, The Banker's Daughter, La Tosca, In Darkest Russia, Under Two Flags, The Devil, Two Little Vagrants, The Silver King, The Girl of the Golden West, The Galley Slave, Samson, The Nigger, The Two Orphans, The House Next Door, Cinderella, The Crisis, Sweet Kitty Bellairs, Jim, the Penman, The Virginian, Du Barry, Alias Jimmy Valentine, The Heir to the Hurrah, The Deep Purple, The Lion and the Mouse, The Lights O'London, The Sporting Duchess, Regeneration, Leah Kleschna, The Third Degree, Pretty Peggy, The Spendthrift, The Squaw Man, The Easiest Way, Held by the Enemy, The Thief, Sapho, The Fatal Card, The Typhoon. At Fourteenth Street Theatre: The Fortune Hunter, The Woman in the Case, The Christian, The Prince Chap, Three Weeks.

1912-13: From December 2, 1912, to April 5, 1913, at Star Theatre (no programs extant and press reports are scanty so the repertory is incomplete): Alias Jimmy Valentine, The Girl of the Golden West, The Easiest Way, The Gamblers, Sapho. At Academy of Music from April 7, 1913: The Lily, The Greyhound, Checkers, Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford, A Butterfly on the Wheel, A Woman's Way, Wildfire, The Concert, The Woman, East Lynne, Alias Jimmy Valentine, The Deserters, The Rosary, The Merchant of Venice, Camille, Old Heidelberg, The Two Orphans, Zira, The Confession, Mrs. Dane's Defense.

1913-14: The Great Diamond Robbery, Mother, The Still Alarm, The Third Degree, The Resurrection, The Count of Monte Cristo, Lena Rivers, A Romance of the Underworld, The Escape, The Volunteer Organist, Trilby, Life's Shop Window, Salomy Jane, The Ninety and Nine, Mendel Beiliss, Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp, Rip Van Winkle, What Happened to Mary, The Yoke, The Bandit King, The Price, The Desperate Chance, The House of Bondage, The Conspiracy, The Wrong Way, The Man Inside, The Governor's Lady, Ten Nights in a Barroom, Strongheart, Forty-Five Minutes from Broadway, The Ghost Breaker, Merely Mary Ann, The Master Mind, The Climbers, One Day, Damaged Goods.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Published Sources:

New York Dramatic Mirror, 1910-14.

New York Times, 1910-14.

Ruhl Arthur. "Ten-Twenty-Thirty." The Outlook 98 ( August 19, 1911): 886-91.

Weldon B. Durham

ACTORS' THEATRE. The Actors' Theatre ( New York, New York) was organized in 1922 as a project loosely connected with Actors' Equity Association. When the company opened with Malvaloca, by Serafin and Jaoquín Alvarez Quintero on October 2, 1922, it called itself the Equity Players, but that name changed after the first two seasons when it disassociated itself from the union. All productions the first two years were presented at the Forty-eighth Street Theatre. Thereafter, the company usually played at the Comedy Theatre, located on West Forty-first Street, between Broadway and Sixth Avenue.

Equity Players came into existence as an outgrowth of the 1919 union strike and "as a natural and logical desire of the acting profession to express the ideals

-4-

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American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Bibliography 8
  • Bibliography 13
  • Bibliography 22
  • Bibliography 24
  • Bibliography 27
  • Bibliography 31
  • Bibliography 36
  • Bibliography 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • B 41
  • Bibliography 51
  • Bibliography 55
  • Bibliography 61
  • Bibliography 63
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 72
  • C 73
  • Bibliography 80
  • Bibliography 86
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bibliography 94
  • Bibliography 97
  • D 99
  • Bibliography 103
  • Bibliography 111
  • Bibliography 118
  • Bibliography 126
  • Bibliography 134
  • Bibliography 140
  • Bibliography 145
  • Bibliography 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Bibliography 158
  • E 159
  • F 165
  • Bibliography 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • G 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Bibliography 188
  • Bibliography 190
  • Bibliography 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • H 205
  • Bibliography 208
  • Bibliography 210
  • Bibliography 212
  • Bibliography 220
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Bibliography 231
  • I 233
  • PERSONNEL 237
  • J 239
  • Bibliography 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • K 245
  • Bibliography 247
  • L 249
  • Bibliography 253
  • Bibliography 260
  • Bibliography 262
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 276
  • M 277
  • Bibliography 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Bibliography 284
  • Bibliography 289
  • Bibliography 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Bibliography 300
  • Bibliography 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • N 311
  • Bibliography 317
  • Bibliography 322
  • Bibliography 325
  • Bibliography 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • Bibliography 338
  • O 341
  • Bibliography 346
  • Bibliography 348
  • P 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Bibliography 358
  • Bibliography 363
  • Bibliography 367
  • Bibliography 370
  • Bibliography 377
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 391
  • R 393
  • Bibliography 396
  • Bibliography 399
  • Bibliography 402
  • Bibliography 404
  • S 405
  • Bibliography 407
  • Bibliography 411
  • Bibliography 413
  • Bibliography 416
  • Bibliography 424
  • Bibliography 428
  • Bibliography 432
  • T 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • U 443
  • Bibliography 447
  • V 449
  • Bibliography 453
  • W 455
  • Bibliography 460
  • Bibliography 463
  • Bibliography 470
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 478
  • Bibliography 482
  • Bibliography 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Y 489
  • Bibliography 492
  • APPENDIX I CHRONOLOGY OF THEATRE COMPANIES 493
  • APPENDIX II THEATRE COMPANIES BY STATE 497
  • Index of Personal Names and Play Titles 501
  • About the Contributors 535
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