The Role of State Supreme Courts in the New Judicial Federalism

By Susan P. Fino | Go to book overview

4. The Work of Six Supreme Courts

In this chapter, I compare the performance of six state courts of last resort--Arizona, Kentucky, California, Michigan, Nebraska and New Jersey--for 1975. I focus on three measures of performance: dissent rates, rates of reversals of lower court decisions and judicial activism scores. I also formulate some theories to account for the variation in the performance of the courts.


METHODOLOGY

The opinions of six state courts of last resort for 1975 were content analyzed and coded in the effort to illustrate some aspects of the model of state court performance presented in Chapter 1. I have selected one state from each of the six court classes for study. The state courts chosen exhibit different institutional and cultural characteristics, but I make no attempt to argue that this limited sample of courts is representative of all the states. Therefore, I do not argue that my findings here are generalizable to all state courts of last resort. However, I do believe my findings are suggestive since they seem to point to fruitful areas for future, comprehensive studies.

I have chosen to begin my study of state supreme courts in 1975. This choice was based upon practical and theoretical reasons. The 1976 edition of State Court Systems, which describes the institutional characteristics of the state courts just prior to January 1, 1976, is the first readily available catalogue of information on the courts of all fifty states. Since I am interested in the effect of institutional characteristics on state supreme court performance, my choice of years for the study

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Role of State Supreme Courts in the New Judicial Federalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Legal Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1. a Model of Supreme Court Performance 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2. Institutional Characteristics of State Supreme Courts 25
  • Notes 46
  • 3. the Justices 49
  • Notes 64
  • 4. the Work of Six Supreme Courts 65
  • Notes 85
  • 5. a Closer Look at Six Courts 87
  • Notes 109
  • 6. Conclusions 111
  • Note 118
  • Appendix 119
  • Bibliography 143
  • Index to Cases 147
  • Subject Index 149
  • About the Author 155
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.