The French Revolution Debate in English Literature and Culture

By Lisa Plummer Crafton | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I wish to thank Steven Blakemore and George Bretherton for steering me to helpful scholarship on the settlement of 1689 and on later phases of the struggle to repeal the Test and Corporation Acts. Neither, of course, bears any responsibility for the ways I've applied that scholarship. More general thanks are due to my colleagues in our seminar, Professor Bromwich, and the NEH.


NOTES
1.
The Correspondence of Edmund Burke, ed. Thomas W. Copeland, 10 vols. ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1958- 1978), 6:25-26, 30. Hereafter abridged to Correspondence.
2.
Burke was a long way from embarking on a crusade. To Earl Fitzwilliam about this time he referred to France as "undone." Correspondence, 6:36.
3.
Carl Cone, Burke and the Nature of Politics, 2 vols. ( Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1957), 2:301-2.
4.
William B. Todd, A Bibliography of Edmund Burke ( London: Rupert Hart-Davis, 1964), 143.
5.
The Parliamentary History of England ( London: Hansard, 1817), 28:439.
6.
Burke's intention would be greatly reinforced by a remark of Thomas Paine discussed later in this essay.
7.
Richard Price, Political Writings, ed. D. O. Thomas ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), 186.
8.
Although he had written "almost the only lawful king in the world" [my emphasis]--and Burke quotes him accurately--Price conceded no other basis for lawfulness in the Discourse.
9.
Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France, ed. Conor Cruise O'Brien ( Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1986), 89. Subsequent references to this edition will be made parenthetically in the text.
10.
The Revolution Society's annual meeting commemorated the birthday of William III, November 4th. The statement adopted in its centennial observance declared
1. That all civil and political authority is derived from the people.
2. That the abuse of power justifies resistance.
3. That the right of private judgment, liberty of conscience, trial by jury, the freedom of the press and the freedom of election ought ever to be held sacred and inviolable.

Albert Goodwin, The Friends of Liberty: The English Democratic Movement in the Age of the French Revolution ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1979), 87. Price's own three-part statement is an acknowledged abridgment, but his third proposition, on which he places special emphasis and to which Burke

-21-

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The French Revolution Debate in English Literature and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions to the Study of World Literature ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xv
  • Chronology xvii
  • Burke's Perception of Richard Price 1
  • Notes 21
  • Religion and Politics in the Revolution Debate: Burke, Wollstonecraft, Paine 27
  • Notes 38
  • The "Ancient Voices" of Blake's The French Revolution 41
  • Notes 53
  • Arguing Benevolence: Wordsworth, Godwin, and the 1790s 59
  • Notes 76
  • "Great Burke," Thomas Carlyle, and the French Revolution 83
  • Notes 103
  • Politics of the Episteme: The Collapse of the Discourse of General Nature and the Reaction to the French Revolution 107
  • Notes 118
  • Representations of Revolutionary Women in Political Caricature 123
  • Notes 131
  • Postscript: The French Revolution and Romanticism 137
  • Select Bibliography 145
  • Index 149
  • About the Contributors 155
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