The Evolution of Educational Theory in the United States

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

Rights Act in 1964, the Tinker decision of 1969, and the Roe decision of 1973 all testify to the degree to which the United States was struggling to put the civil rights movement into proper perspective and to further create conditions that were conducive to the improvement of the lives of all people. Kennedy's concept of the New Frontier held wider significance and implications far beyond the extent of his thinking and vision.


NOTES
1.
Cleveland served two unconnected terms, from 1885 to 1889, as twenty-second president, and from 1893 to 1897, as twenty-fourth president. He was defeated for reelection by Benjamin Harrison ( 1833-1901), whom he had defeated in 1892.
2.
The Nineteenth Amendment was first proposed on June 4, 1919, and was ratified on August 26, 1920. Amendments to give women the right to vote were introduced in the U.S. Congress more than 40 years before this one was finally ratified.
3.
President Harding died on August 2, 1923. It is not clear why Coolidge chose this date to make his announcement. This author thinks that he chose the anniversary of Harding's death to show his respect for the memory of a man he admired and to give his successor publicity in launching a successful election campaign. Indeed, his successor, Herbert Hoover, won the election in 1928.
4.
Roosevelt served from 1933 to 1945, the longest of any president. On March 24, 1947, the Twenty-second Amendment was proposed and was adopted on March 1, 1951, stating, "No person shall be elected to the office of President more than twice."
5.
As vice-president in the Harding administration, Coolidge could not escape the Teapot Dome and other such scandals. Although in 1924 he forced the resignation of Attorney General Harry M. Dougherty and replaced him with Harlan F. Stone, Coolidge remained tarnished by the scandals. That as president he pursued Harding's policies added doubt to the problems of confidence he was having with the public. This is partly the reason he decided against running for a second term in 1928.
6.
Herbert Kliebard, The Struggle for the American Curriculum, 1893-1958 ( New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1987), p. 180.
8.
Roosevelt assumed the office of president on September 14, 1901, when President William McKinley ( 1843-1901), who was elected in 1897, died from an assassin's bullet. Roosevelt served until 1909.
9.
The record shows that Lindburgh took off at 5:21 P.M. from Roosevelt Field near New York on May 20 and landed at Le Bouget Field near Paris at 10:21 P.M. Paris time on May 21 covering a distance of 3,600 miles.
10.
The inauguration was the last to be held in March. Under Amendment 20 to the Constitution proposed on March 3, 1932, and ratified on February 3, 1933, all future inaugurations would be held in January.
11.
Robert E. Potter, The Stream of American Education ( New York: The American Book Company, 1974), p. 371.
12.
The special session of Congress lasted from March 9 to June 16, 1933.
13.
Potter, The Stream of American Education, p. 391.

-181-

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The Evolution of Educational Theory in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Origins of the Theory of Western Education 15
  • Notes 34
  • 2 - Theory During the Colonial Period 37
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Theory During the Revolutionary Period 61
  • Notes 80
  • 4 - Theory During the Common School Movement 83
  • 5 - The Theory of Secondary, Higher, and Teacher Education 103
  • Notes 121
  • 6 - The Courts and the Theory of Education for African Americans 125
  • 7 - Theory to Address National Problems: From Warren G. Harding to Bill Clinton 153
  • Notes 181
  • Conclusion 210
  • Notes 211
  • Selected Bibliography 215
  • Index 237
  • About the Author 251
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