Economic Justice in Africa: Adjustment and Sustainable Development

By George W. Shepherd; Karamo N. M. Sonko | Go to book overview

supporters have identified the need for the rule of law. 44 In most instances they are referring to the need for a reliable judiciary for commercial reasons, but it seems impossible in this sense to sever the commercial and civil spheres; a judiciary without legitimacy due to failure to uphold civil rights will certainly not be seen as legitimate when it attempts to uphold contract rights. Second, the World Bank-IMF ideology is one of free market competition. If one justifies such a free market as good in the commercial sector, should it not be equally as efficient in the realm of ideas and policy? Will an informed (and interested) populace not reject ideas that deliver economic doom as quickly as they reject shoddy manufactures?

In a more democratic Africa, it would seem logical that the World Bank and the IMF should promote a diversity of economic models of development provided that those models involve the participation of the people who will benefit from as well as implement them. It is time for the World Bank and the IMF to demonstrate a genuine faith in the most important aspect of the free market concept--the free market of ideas. Africans have already begun to implement new avenues of political participation and personal security protection. These changes have important implications for adjustment programs.

First, the IDAs can no longer believe that governments will be able to implement these programs effectively when faced with strong public opposition. Second, African leaders are likely to be more anxious to develop means of cushioning the blow of adjustment programs on the populace; this was always true with regard to the politically powerful elements of the populace, but now it is likely to represent a much broader proportion of the population. Third, given that programs will be implemented by governments that have widely accepted legitimacy, and that include the population in decision making, it is likely that those adjustment programs that are accepted will be able to be implemented much more fully, since they will have popular support, or at least tolerance. There is therefore hope that given improved accountability of governance, institutionalized avenues of participation, flexible adjustment programs, and improved economic performance, African personal security violations will decline in the future.


NOTES

I would like to thank George Shepherd, Karamo N. M. Sonko, and Eileen McCarthy- Arnolds for comments on earlier versions of this chapter, I would also like to thank Ann Seidman and Michael Nieman for comments based on my presentation of this material at the African Studies Association conference in 1991. I am also grateful for the assistance of Linda Butenhoff and Joy Sobrepeña in collecting and checking data. Any errors or omissions remain my responsibility.

1.
Haider Ali Khan, "Economic Modeling of Structural Adjustment Programs: Impact on Human Conditions," Africa Today 37, no. 4 ( 1990): 29-38.
2.
For example, Edward Jaycox, a World Bank vice president, noted in 1988 that

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Justice in Africa: Adjustment and Sustainable Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.