International Handbook on Race and Race Relations

By Jay A. Sigler | Go to book overview
illegitimate children, children "enfranchised" by their parents before they have reached the age of consent, and so on.

There is an uneasy relationship between white middle-class feminists and the movement of Third World women in Canada. Besieged Indian communities which are desperately trying to hold the nuclear family together, can scarcely be expected to join the American feminist demand for smashing the nuclear family. The "snatching" of Indian babies by white social workers, even if feminist, and separation of Indian women from their husbands in the "transition houses" for battered wives (even if run by "feminists"), are scarcely progressive alternatives. To put it another way, both "social chauvinism" and "social imperialism" can be seen in certain attitudes of some Euro-Canadian feminists, and it remains to be seen whether they will show more confidence in the abilities of Canada's Third World women to lead their own struggles. This problem surfaced dramatically as rifts within the Canadian women's delegation to the International Women's Conference in Nairobi, July 1985. The problem is also the subject of a teleplay on child apprehension by the Canadian Metis writer Maria Campbell. See also Kenyatta, 1983; Davis, 1983; Dixon, 1983.

9.
Riel and other literate Metis leaders were fully aware of ideological currents and movements in other parts of the world. This ideological cosmopolitanism has already been partially documented by Woodcock ( 1975) and is turning up in the virtual explosion by researchers ( Bourgeault, 1983, McLean, 1985) and others. In the French archives, for example, Bourgeault has unearthed an 1886 pamphlet which French socialists directed to Riel, using Riel's name as "nom de plume." Entitled "Socialisme et Colonies," it urges the Metis to ally with French interests against British imperialism. These "socialists" urge Riel to embrace the French Empire rather than the British since the French Empire is more progressive, being republican, having separated church and state, being more rationalist, and having revolutionary origins. Nicer examples of socialists justifying imperialism would not come along until the collapse of the Second International in 1914.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abella A. Nationalism, Communism and Canadian Labour. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1973.

-----, and H. Troper. "The Line Must Be Drawn Somewhere: Canada and Jewish Refugees, 1933-39." Canadian Historical Review 60, no. 2 ( 1979): 300-20.

Amin S. Class and Nation, Historically and in the Current Crisis. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1980a.

-----. Three Essays on World Capitalism. Madras: Nalanda House (also P.B. 2855 Station D, Ottawa, Canada), 1980b.

-----. The Future of Maoism. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1984.

Asch M. Home and Native Land: Aboriginal Rights and the Canadian Constitution. Toronto: Methuen, 1984.

Avery D. Dangerous Foreigners. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1979.

Baum G., and D. Cameron. Ethics and Economics: Canada's Catholic Bishops and the Economic Crisis. Toronto: James Lorimer, 1984.

-63-

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International Handbook on Race and Race Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Notes xviii
  • AUSTRALIA 1
  • Bibliography 20
  • BRAZIL 23
  • Notes 36
  • Notes 39
  • CANADA 43
  • Notes 59
  • Notes 63
  • FIJI Ralph Premdas 67
  • Notes 97
  • Notes 99
  • FRANCE 101
  • Bibliography 112
  • INDIA 117
  • Bibliography 126
  • JAPAN 129
  • Bibliography 152
  • MALAYSIA 155
  • Notes 163
  • Notes 164
  • NETHERLANDS 167
  • Notes 187
  • Notes 189
  • NEW ZEALAND 191
  • Notes 209
  • Notes 211
  • SINGAPORE 213
  • Notes 229
  • Notes 230
  • SOUTH AFRICA 233
  • Notes 258
  • Bibliography 261
  • SUDAN 263
  • Notes 278
  • Notes 279
  • SWITZERLAND 281
  • Notes 296
  • Notes 298
  • THAILAND Suchitra Punyaratabandhu-Bhakdi and Juree Vichit-Vadakdan 301
  • Notes 318
  • Notes 319
  • TRINIDAD 321
  • Notes 333
  • Notes 335
  • UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS 339
  • Notes 362
  • Notes 367
  • UNITED KINGDOM 369
  • Notes 390
  • Bibliography 393
  • UNITED STATES 395
  • Notes 416
  • Notes 420
  • WEST GERMANY 423
  • Notes 440
  • Notes 443
  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE 449
  • APPENDIX: RACIAL/ETHNIC DIVISIONS 455
  • Index 467
  • ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS 479
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