The Effort-Net Return Model of Employee Motivation: Principles, Propositions, and Prescriptions

By Philip C. Grant | Go to book overview

Preface

The purpose of this book is to provide insight into the variety of avenues, suggested by the effort-net return model of employee motivation, that management can pursue to help build employee motivation. Classical thinking in the field of motivation is far too narrow and restrictive. Of course, employee motivation is not entirely within the control of management, but great opportunities to heighten employee motivation are missed when one relies for guidance on the overly simplistic theories of human motivation that have been popularized by the literature over the last few decades.

Though over 200 prescriptions for motivating employees are provided in chapters 2, 3, 4, and 5 of this book, this inventory should be regarded as a sampling--a list of courses of action, which is far from exhaustive but nonetheless representative of the avenues managers can pursue to enhance employee motivation. It is hoped that the inventory will stimulate the reader's thinking about additional ways to heighten employee motivation.

In Chapter 6 a number of real-life case problems are presented with analyses and suggested prescriptive packages. This presentation is provided to help the reader "move" from reading to using the material presented here. Chapter 6 also provides numerous instruments and exercises which should add considerably to the reader's ability and motivation to implement this material.

The reader should keep in mind throughout the book that a given prescription may well have a different motivational impact on different people. This is because of individual differences and perceptions, which are highly personalized. Different employees will perceive the nature of a given prescription in different ways. Likewise, a given prescription may affect a given employee in different ways at different points in time because conditions, needs, moods, and personal goals, for example, change over time.

-ix-

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