Ethnic Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy

By Mohammed E. Ahrari | Go to book overview

Conclusions

Mohammed E. Ahrari

The preceding chapters present a picture of enhanced activities on the part of most ethnic groups. What appears to be happening is that the growing hyperpluralism of the American polity is also enabling the ethnic groups to pick up the pace of their activities without necessarily enhancing their influence.

Revolutionary changes in communication technology have been shrinking the world into a "global village." Growing violence in South Africa or the Middle East now is not only reported almost instantaneously all over the world, but the implications of such incidents on regional stability and world peace are also becoming sources of concern for a larger number of actors now than ever before. These advancements in communications are also enabling the ethnic groups to keep abreast of events in their "old countries."

Despite congressional activism' and assertiveness on foreign policy issues, the president is likely to play a leading role. Depending on how popular a president remains at various points during his term of office, his ability to persuade Congress on various foreign policy issues is likely to vary accordingly in the future. What both Congress and the president are likely to do is to consult with an influential ethnic group in the future, as they have done in the past, and use it to build support when the objectives of that ethnic group are in harmony with the ones promoted by either branch. At no time in the foreseeable future is any ethnic group likely to determine the American foreign policy toward its old country. That prerogative, despite the growing nature of hyperpluralism, is destined to stay with the president, his top national security aides, and Congress.

When one looks for characteristics of ethnic groups that might be used as determinants of their influence or power quotient in the United States, three

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethnic Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.