Coping with Cultural and Racial Diversity in Urban America

By Wallace E. Lambert; Donald M. Taylor | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Wallace E. Lambert is a professor of psychology at McGill University with research interests in social and experimental psychology, cross-national studies, and psycho- and socio-linguistics. These are reflected in numerous publications, including Social Psychology, a textbook written in collaboration with his brother, William W. Lambert; Children's Views of Foreign Peoples: A Cross National Study, with Otto Klineberg; Bilingual Education of Children: The St. Lambert Experiment; Tu, Vous, Usted: A Social Psychology of Forms of Address; French Speakers' Skill with Grammatical Gender: An Example of Rule-Governed Behavior, all three in collaboration with Richard G. Tucker; Attitudes and Motivation in Second Language Learning in collaboration with Robert C. Gardner; Language, Psychology and Culture: Essays by W. E. Lambert, edited by A. S. Dil; and Child Rearing Values: A Cross-National Study, with Josiane Hamers and Nancy Frasure Smith.

Donald M. Taylor is a professor of psychology at McGill University. Professor Taylor's research interest is in intergroup relations, including such topics as ethnic stereotypes, intergroup communication, ethnic identity, and multicultural societies. His research has been conducted in diverse regions of the world, including the United States, Canada, Britain, South and South-East Asia. Professor Taylor has contributed numerous articles in Canadian, American, European, and Asian journals, coauthored a major work on multiculturalism titled Multiculturalism and Ethnic Attitudes in Canada with J. W. Berry and R. Kalin, and more recently, a book in collaboration with F. M. Moghaddam titled Theories of Intergroup Relations. He also serves on the editorial board of a number of scientific journals.

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