Cognitive Styles and Classroom Learning

By Harry Morgan | Go to book overview

recognized in classroom practice in such things as invented spelling, whole language, affective curriculum, the child-centered approach, and cooperative learning. In each of these approaches to understanding human development, curriculum design and teaching practices, the child's observations and interpretations are highly respected. Humanistic theorists believed that educators, and those who direct programs for children, should focus on the self and create a variety of experiences from which learners can acquire information. In this endeavor, many humanistic teachers discovered the philosophy of John Dewey who had espoused similar practices in the early 1900s.

As of now, humanistic education is seldom spoken of in current educational forums, but curriculum reforms that emerged from its 1960s and 1970s popularity have left us with an enriched collection of affective teaching and learning improvements.

Present-day educational programs and practices have also been enriched by the philosophical and theoretical variations that have been described in literature and made available to educational planners and practitioners. This literature has, among other things, informed educators that an understanding of the role of self and experience in human development is essential. It is within this context that cognitive style theory has emerged as an important development in professional approaches to classroom teaching and learning.


REFERENCES

Abeles M., and Schilder P. ( 1935). "Psychogenic Loss of Personal Identity." Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry 34, 587-604.

Adam B. D. ( 1978). "Inferiorization and Self-Esteem." Social Psychology 41, 47-53.

Alpert-Gillis L. J., and Connell J. P. ( 1989). "Gender and Sex-Role Influences on Children's Self-Esteem." Journal of Personality 57, 97- 114.

Anderson J. R. ( 1983). The Architecture of Cognition. Cambridge. MA: Harvard University Press.

Anderson J. R. ( 1990). Cognitive Psychology and its Implications. New York: W. H. Freeman.

Astington J. W., Harris P. L., and Olson D. R. ( 1988). Developing Theories of Mind. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Bargar R. R., and Hoover R. L. ( 1984). "Psychological Type and the Matching of Cognitive Styles." Theory Into Practice 23 (1), 56-63.

Barker R. G. ( 1978) Habitats, Environments, and Human Behavior. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bateson G. ( 1988). Mind and Nature: A Necessary Unity. New York: Bantam.

Bennett E. L., Diamond M. C., Krech D., and Rosenzweig M. R.

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Cognitive Styles and Classroom Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Introduction 1
  • References 8
  • 1 - Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Style 9
  • References 33
  • 2 - Theoretical Foundations of Cognitive Style 35
  • References 56
  • 3 - Field Independent and Field Dependent Cognitive Styles 61
  • References 82
  • 4 - The Cognitive Style Context of Reflectivity and Impulsivity 89
  • References 103
  • 5 - Cognitive Styles of Conceptualization 109
  • References 114
  • 6 - The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator 117
  • References 126
  • 7 - Cognitive Style of Leveling-Sharpening 129
  • References 135
  • 8 - Conclusion 137
  • References 156
  • Selected Bibliography 161
  • Index 177
  • About the Author 185
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