Cognitive Styles and Classroom Learning

By Harry Morgan | Go to book overview

The MBTI is designed to indirectly provide educators and psychologists insight into an individual's "personal construct" and its underlying meanings. According to Kelly, these individual variations significantly influence our social interactions as well as our view of self. He has referred to this overall pattern of individual differentiation as "Fundamental Postulate," a label which imposes a sense of invariant permanence. MBTI provides opportunities for psychologists, counselors, and teachers to measure the extent to which Kelly's personal construct theory, which focuses on individual difference in interpreting experiences, contribute to establishing personality types with consistent ways of viewing the self in society. It is important to know whether certain personality attributes are malleable through self-awareness, whether they change with maturation, or are generally permanent over the course of one's life.

After studying the philosophy and theory of Jung, Katherine C. Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers placed themselves in social situations to observe and catalog various personality traits along the lines of Jung's work. From this empirical activity, Briggs and Myers designed instruments to measure personality types that were highly compatible with the philosophy and theory of George Kelly. Their work has provided insight into some of the complex intersections between cognitive style, personality, and classroom learning for psychologists, counselors, and educators.


REFERENCES

Bargar R. B. and Hoover R. L. ( 1984). "Psychological Type and the Matching of Cognitive Styles." Theory Into Practice 23 (1), 56-63.

Brody L. R. ( 1985). "Gender Differences in Emotional Development: A Review of Theories and Research." Journal of Personality 53, 102- 149.

Carey J. C., Fleming S. D., and Roberts D. Y. ( 1989). "The Myers- Briggs Indicator as a Measure of Aspects of Cognitive Style." Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development 22, 94- 99.

Carland J. C., and Carland J. W. ( 1990). "Cognitive Styles and the Edu-cation of Computer Information Systems Students." Journal of Research on Computing in Education 1( 23), 114-126.

Carlson J. G. ( 1985). "Recent Assessments of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator." Journal of Personality Assessment 49, 356-365.

Carskadon T. G. ( 1978). "Uses of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in Psychology Courses and Discussion Groups." Teaching of Psychology 3 (5), 140-142.

Carskadon T. G. ( 1979). "Clinical and Counseling Aspects of theMyers-Briggs Type Indicator: A Research Review."

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Cognitive Styles and Classroom Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Introduction 1
  • References 8
  • 1 - Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Style 9
  • References 33
  • 2 - Theoretical Foundations of Cognitive Style 35
  • References 56
  • 3 - Field Independent and Field Dependent Cognitive Styles 61
  • References 82
  • 4 - The Cognitive Style Context of Reflectivity and Impulsivity 89
  • References 103
  • 5 - Cognitive Styles of Conceptualization 109
  • References 114
  • 6 - The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator 117
  • References 126
  • 7 - Cognitive Style of Leveling-Sharpening 129
  • References 135
  • 8 - Conclusion 137
  • References 156
  • Selected Bibliography 161
  • Index 177
  • About the Author 185
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