Women's Roles in Ancient Civilizations: A Reference Guide

By Bella Vivante | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Bella Zweig, "The Primal Mind: Using Native American Models to Approach the Study of Women in Ancient Greece" (in Feminist Theory and the Classics, ed. by Nancy Rabinowitz and Amy Richlin [ London: Routledge, 1993], pp. 145-180) shows the value of using this approach. Two works important for showing this distinction in women's modes of thinking or behavior are Carol Gilligan , In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1982), and Luce Iragaray, Speculum: Of the Other Woman, trans. by G. Gill ( Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1985).
2.
See especially Gerda Lerner, The Creation of Patriarchy ( New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986).
3.
These terms, although reflecting a western European point of orientation in their origin, are more common and more concise than eastern or western Asia.

FURTHER READING

Allen Paula Gunn. 1986. The Sacred Hoop: Recovering the Feminine in American Indian Traditions. Boston: Beacon Press.

Cannon Katie G. 1988. Black Womanist Ethics. Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press.

Daly Mary. 1978. Gyn/Ecology: A Metaphysics of Radical Feminism. Boston: Beacon Press.

hooks bell. 1989. Talking Back: Thinking Feminist, Thinking Black. Boston: South End Press.

Lerner Gerda. 1986. The Creation of Patriarchy. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Medicine B. 1978. The Native American Woman: A Perspective. Austin, TX: National Educational Laboratory Publishers.

Ruddick Sara. 1989. Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace. Boston: Beacon Press.

Zweig Bella. 1993. "The Primal Mind: Using Native American Models to Approach the Study of Women in Ancient Greece." In Feminist Theory and the Classics, ed. by Nancy Rabinowitz and Amy Richlin, 145-180. London: Routledge.

-xvii-

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Women's Roles in Ancient Civilizations: A Reference Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Further Reading xvii
  • Part I - Asia: the Far East 1
  • 1 - Women in Ancient China 2
  • Notes 32
  • Further Reading 34
  • 2 - Women in Ancient India 35
  • Part II - Asia: the near East 83
  • 4 - Women in Ancient Mesopotamia 85
  • 5 - Women in the Ancient Levant 115
  • Part III - Africa 153
  • 6 - Women in Ancient Egypt 155
  • 7 - Women in Ancient West Africa 188
  • Part IV - The Mediterranean 217
  • 8 - Women in Ancient Greece 218
  • 9 - Women in the Ancient Roman World 257
  • Part V - The Americas 291
  • 10 - Women in Ancient Mesoamerica 292
  • 11 - Women in the Ancient Andes 313
  • Further Reading 361
  • Glossary 363
  • Index 367
  • About the Contributors 387
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