Management Analysis in Public Organizations: History, Concepts, and Techniques

By Ray C. Oman; Stephen L. Damours et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Management Analysis Studies: An Overview

As discussed in the Introduction and Chapter 1, organizations in almost all sectors of U.S. society are confronting a difficult and often turbulent environment. Organizations are being challenged today as they have not been in the recent past. The period of almost continual growth and expansion that we knew in much of the 1960s and 1970s has obviously ended, and new and stiffer challenges abide in almost all quarters. For private firms this challenge comes largely in the form of increased foreign competition, while for public organizations it takes the form of static or declining budget resources.

The time has come when, if organizations are truly to compete, they must seek real solutions to the real severe problems they confront. No longer will the business fads referred to in a recent article be sufficient to solve the problems many organizations face.1 The key to resolving organizational problems lies in intelligent decision making. The twin factors of good information and good analysis are essential to sound decision making. While these factors in themselves do not assure sound decisions, they increase the probability of good decision making and ensure better performance over a period of time.

Management analysis (MA) is uniquely able to provide good information and good analysis to organization managers confronting difficult decisions. It does this by focusing on the value of information and analysis and on the organization's decision-making and implementation processes. Having grown and matured in the United States over the past forty years, MA embraces a wide variety of approaches and techniques that can improve organization effectiveness, efficiency, quality, and productivity.

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