A State within a State: Industrial Relations in Israel, 1965-1987

By Ran Chermesh | Go to book overview

9
Epilogue

According to my lights, a last chapter should resemble a primitive orgy after harvest. The work may have come to an end, but the worker cannot let go all at once. He is still full of energy that will fester if it cannot find an outlet. Accordingly, he is allowed a time of license, when he may say all sorts of things he would think twice before saying in more sober moments, when he is no longer bound by logic and evidence but free to speculate about what he has done. ( Homans, 1961, p. 378)

Homans may have picked the most appropriate term for an epilogue, an orgy. My work is done, and I keep asking myself, so what? What is its message? What did I gain from the analysis? What do I hope you, the reader, has gained?

Israeli strikes were always a mystery for me. The deeper I got into them, the more elusive they seemed. For years I looked for a key. Are they social events enacted by isolated masses, as Kerr and Siegel ( 1954) claimed in their classic work? If so, how is it that Israeli strikers are often the least isolated and most established employees, those working in the public sector? Are Israeli strikes explainable in political and organizational terms, as Shorter and Tilly ( 1974) contend for France? If so, how is it that a political upheaval as impressive as the defeat of the Labor Party, the dominant party since the 1930s, did not lead to a total disaster in the IR arena? If strikes are the cynical outcome of skilled union leaders who abuse their authority to establish a bridge between their followers' expectations and realistic possibilities ( Ashenfelter and Johnson, 1969), how is it that strikes in Israel are so short? If strikes are like road accidents, caused by barriers of communication ( Hicks, 1963), how is it that the most experienced leaders of the most solid unions and the professional negotiators of the public employers fall into the trap of industrial strife? And, if an institutionalized irs should be, as believes Snyder ( 1975), responsive primarily to rational economic factors, how is it that Israeli strikes have almost no relationship at all to macro-economic developments?

What is the rationale of Israeli strikes? Barel and Michael ( 1977) assumed that the syntax is economic. They intended their book on Israeli strikes in the 1960s to focus almost exclusively on the factor of economic costs. They ended up with a pioneering venture, limited by its non-theoretical view.

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A State within a State: Industrial Relations in Israel, 1965-1987
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.