Action Research and Organizational Development

By J. Barton Cunningham | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has undergone many changes based on comments from colleagues and my practice in the field. My thinking will continue to evolve over the next number of years from the continuing act of carrying out research in field settings and from the comments of those I have worked with.

In any such endeavor, there is the tendency for one to think that his creation is of tremendous importance. There are several people whose ideas are indirectly or directly a main thrust of this work. The spirit of this book owes much to continuing association with Alex MacEachem. It grew from the practices and ideas of professors and colleagues I was associated with over twenty years ago at the University of Southern California including Wesley Bjur, Ross Clayton, Neely Gardner, Shan Martin, Alberto-Guerrio Ramos, and Gilbert Siegel. Credit is obviously due to many of the people I associated with when I was at the Tavistock Institute in 1981 and 1982. More recently, there are other people who contributed significantly in my development. I have had long discussions with Eric Trist about the action research practices that represent the Tavistock tradition. I have also had several opportunities to piece together an appreciation of the Lewinian action research practices through a close working relationship with Jim MacGregor, one of Alex Bavelas' students. John Farquharson and Joe Lischeron continue to be the source of ideas and inspiration. Most of all, I would like to thank my wife Donna for helping me prepare this draft for publication.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Action Research and Organizational Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.