Cold War Patriot and Statesman, Richard M. Nixon

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

STRENGTHENING COOPERATION BETWEEN THE CONGRESS AND THE EXECUTIVE BRANCHES

The responsible and effective exercise of the war powers requires the fullest cooperation between the Congress and the Executive and the prudent fulfillment by each branch of its constitutional responsibilities. House Joint Resolution 542 includes certain constructive measures which would foster this process by enhancing the flow of information from the executive branch to the Congress. Section 3, for example, calls for consultations with the Congress before and during the involvement of the United States forces in hostilities abroad. This provision is consistent with the desire of this Administration for regularized consultations with the Congress in an even wider range of circumstances.

I believe that full and cooperative participation in foreign policy matters by both the executive and the legislative branches could be enhanced by a careful and dispassionate study of their constitutional roles. Helpful proposals for such a study have already been made in the Congress. I would welcome the establishment of a non-partisan commission on the constitutional roles of the Congress and the President in the conduct of foreign affairs. This commission could make a thorough review of the principal constitutional issues in Executive- Congresssional relations, including the war powers, the international agreement powers, and the question of Executive privilege, and then submit its recommendations to the President and the Congress. The members of such a commission could be drawn from both parties--and could represent many perspectives including those of the Congress, the executive branch, the legal profession, and the academic community.

This Administration is dedicated to strengthening cooperation between the Congress and the President in the conduct of foreign affairs and to preserving the constitutional prerogatives of both branches of our Government. I know that the Congress shares that goal. A commission on the constitutional roles of the Congress and the President would provide a useful opportunity for both branches to work together toward that common objective.

Richard Nixon


NOTES
1.
RN: The Memoirs of Richard Nixon ( New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1978), p. 889 (hereafter cited as Memoirs).
2.
Max Farrand, ed., The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, 4 vols. ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1937), 2, p. 318.
3.
Ibid.; see footnote, p. 319.
4.
Edward S. Corwin, The President: Office and Powers, 1787-1957 ( New York: New York University Press, 1957), p. 171.
5.
See chronological list in Congressional Record, 93rd Cong., 1st Sess., 1973, 119, pt. 20:25066-25076.

-288-

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Cold War Patriot and Statesman, Richard M. Nixon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Foreign Policy Initiatives 1
  • Appendix 34
  • Notes 38
  • 7 Peace or Oil. The Nixon Administration and Its Middle East Policy Choices 119
  • References 135
  • Part II. The Foreign Policy Process 155
  • 9 The Making of the All-Volunteer Armed Force 171
  • 10 The Nixon Doctrine as History and Portent 187
  • Notes 209
  • 13 Nixon Versus the Congress: The War Powers Resolution, 1973 267
  • APPENDIX B 285
  • APPENDIX B 288
  • 14 The War Powers Resolution: An Intersection of Law and Politics 291
  • Notes 316
  • DIRECTORS' MESSAGE 331
  • Index 357
  • About the Editors and Contributors 371
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