Cold War Patriot and Statesman, Richard M. Nixon

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

At the present time, the foreign policy debate in America is dominated by the traditional Cold War approach of the Cold War internationalists and the modified Cold War views of the post-Cold War internationalists. As much as they dislike the act, conservatives realize that its repeal is not possible. Moreover, practically speaking, it has not created unassailable obstacles to presidential discretion in the use of force. They have found they can live with it.

Although post-Cold War internationalists are disappointed with the Resolution's inability to do more to compel the president to report and consult, they are not likely to press for more vigorous enforcement of these provisions unless they feel they have to. They also find that they can live with the act because it reinforces theft contention that foreign policy power must be shared between the branches of government. The War Powers Resolution has created a somewhat different framework for decision making than existed from the time of Korea through the most intense days of the Cold War. Although this contribution is largely symbolic, it cannot be ignored.

At some point, however, this modus vivendi with the law, which both dominant foreign policy schools have achieved, will be threatened by events. When that occurs, presidential noncompliance will compel sharp political and legal challenges to the executive, inviting a similar response from that office. Only at that time will the real consequences of the War Powers Resolution be known.


NOTES
1.
New York Times, November 8, 1973, p. 46.
2.
Ibid.
3.
John A. Silber, "Presidential Handcuffs," The New Republic, February 18, 1985, p. 14.
4.
New York Times, November 9, 1973, column by James Reston, p. 41.
5.
War and Presidential Power: A Chronicle of Congressional Surrender ( New York: Liveright, 1974), p. 221.
6.
Robert F. Turner, The War Powers Resolution: Its Implementation in Theory and Practice ( Philadelphia: Foreign Policy Research Institute, Philadelphia Policy Papers, 1983), p. 107.
7.
Cyrus R. Vance, "Striking the Balance: Congress and the President under the War Powers Resolution," 133U. Pa. L. Rev.85 ( 1984).
8.
New York Times, November 11, 1973, p. 4E.
9.
Graham T. Allison, "Making War: The President and Congress," 40Law and Contemp. Probs.87 ( 1976).
10.
Robert A. Divine, "Roosevelt the Isolationist," in Thomas G. Patterson, ed., Major Problems in American Foreign Policy, Vol. II: Since 1914 ( Lexington, Mass.: Heath, 1984), p. 183.
11.
Ibid.
12.
Ibid.
13.
Secretary of Defense McNamara was quoted as saying that "the ability to go to war without the necessity of arousing the public ire" was an important contribution of

-316-

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Cold War Patriot and Statesman, Richard M. Nixon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Foreign Policy Initiatives 1
  • Appendix 34
  • Notes 38
  • 7 Peace or Oil. The Nixon Administration and Its Middle East Policy Choices 119
  • References 135
  • Part II. The Foreign Policy Process 155
  • 9 The Making of the All-Volunteer Armed Force 171
  • 10 The Nixon Doctrine as History and Portent 187
  • Notes 209
  • 13 Nixon Versus the Congress: The War Powers Resolution, 1973 267
  • APPENDIX B 285
  • APPENDIX B 288
  • 14 The War Powers Resolution: An Intersection of Law and Politics 291
  • Notes 316
  • DIRECTORS' MESSAGE 331
  • Index 357
  • About the Editors and Contributors 371
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