A Theory of Public Opinion

By Francis Graham Wilson | Go to book overview

INDEX
Absolutism: related to social contract, 57; "good prince," 57; confessional state, 57
Academy of Sciences, provided panel of experts, 270
Acta diurna, 114
Acton, Lord ( John Emerich E. D.), 211
Adorno, T. W., 166
Advertising: and public relations, 145; manipulative approach, 145
Alba, F. A. de Toledo, Duke of, 55
Albert the Great, 27
Albig, William, 86-87, 88, 89, 101, 165; defines public as large group, 86; public opinion involves controversial issues, 86
Allport, Floyd H., 85, 101, 107
Allport, Gordon W., 164
Althusius, Johannes, 11
Amiel, H. F., 67
Anarchism, 231-33; favors opinion without coercion, 232; propaganda of the deed, 232-33; rejects political participation, 231-33
Aquinas, St. Thomas, see St. Thomas
Arcana imperii, 54, 68
Archilochus of Paros ( Greek poet), 255
Aristotelian philosophy of public opinion, in Middle Ages, 27-28
Aristotle, 11, 17, 29, 47, 137, 145, 220; mixture of oligarchy and democracy, 23; theory of polity, 23; polity resembles modern democracy, 65, 66, 215; close to conservative mind, 189, 190
Arnold, Thurman, use of "polar words," 99 n.
Artes liberals, and artes serviles, 150, 258
Associated doctrines: parliamentarism, 200; liberal ethics, 200; dictatorship in crisis, 200; progress, 201
Associationist psychology, 122-23; primary emotion, 123; Hume introduces "habit," 123
Atheistic humanism, 198, 228
Attitudes: central in public opinion measurement, 163; related to habit, 163; habit and attitude provide statistical data, 163
Authoritarian personality, 167; not suited for ruling, 265
Averroes, 27, 28
Bacon, Francis, 195-96; and scientific utopia, 193
Bagehot, Walter, 101 n., 123, 201, 211, 217
Balfour, Arthur James, 241
Barker, Ernest, 101 n.
Baroque state, 47, 54-57; monarchy in, 54; unfriendly to Classical idea of citizen, 56
Baschwitz, Kurt, 153
Bauer, Wilhelm, 101, 102; favors idea of antiquity of public opinion, 113, 114; controversy with Tönnies, 121 n.; publicity and mass control, 152
Behavioral science, 17, 88, 145, 163, 260
Benda, Julien, 180; on intellectuals, 281-82
Berelson, Bernard, study of person. ality, 143; not all personalities suited for democracy, 143-44
Bernays, Edward L., 156
Berlin, Isaiah, 259
Bentham, Jeremy, 6, 203, 208

-297-

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