Freedom and Control in Modern Society

By Morroe Berger; Theodore Abel | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

The chapters of this book have three things in common. They deal with important social and political problems of contemporary life; they have been written by scholars who admire Robert M. MacIver and, as his students or colleagues, have learned from him; and they deal with those subjects of social science that have interested MacIver and which he has illuminated in his books and articles for more than three decades.

In planning this book, the editors aimed to obtain contributions that would likewise illuminate, for the general reader, the student, and the professional social scientist, some of the fundamental and persisting problems which human beings face in our day. The editors and contributors hope that these essays will interest the non- specialist who seeks to understand what is happening in the world, the student who seeks not only knowledge of social life but intellectual stimulation, and the specialist and teacher who will be attracted by the quality of these contributions as well as by their adaptability to the classroom. For the classroom, this book will serve well as collateral reading in social science courses, specifically those on methodology, social control, social change, race relations, contemporary government, social psychology, social and political philosophy, as well as some economics courses.

The chapters in one division of this volume examine the relationship of the individual to the group. In his paper, Gardner Murphy summarizes the state of our knowledge of how each generation of human beings becomes socialized in contact with other human beings, how the ways of the group become the ways of the individual born to it. Describing this process as a mixture of "love-feast and battle royal," Dr. Murphy, from the standpoint of psychology, touches upon the need for external controls beyond those of the superego or the conscience, as well as upon the problem of political obedience itself. Robert Bierstedt approaches the same problem from another side--a sociological treatment of the nature of authority and its inherence in social organization (or what MacIver often calls associations).

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Freedom and Control in Modern Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.