Freedom and Control in Modern Society

By Morroe Berger; Theodore Abel | Go to book overview

12
THE UTILITY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

GEORGE CATLIN

Use and Misuse of Political Terminology. That the field of politics is an especial reserve for lawyers is something well recognized, although statistics show that landowners in the past and journalists today offer competition. One medical student, it is reported, was advised by Mr. Ramsay MacDonald to become a lawyer and acted on the advice. He very nearly became Foreign Secretary of Great Britain, thanks to the suggestion. Of recent years, the desirability of bringing trained economists into the affairs of government, where economic issues are involved, has come to be recognized, not indeed without grave distrust, even by politicians. They are tolerated provided they are "on tap but not on top." The economists, also, have thus become great men. Again, when a work of destruction is on hand, the physical scientists have shown that they are nationally indispensable. And, if one has to find oil for the navy, one has to employ a geologist. But the connection between the study of political science and the practice of politics remains vague, ill-defined, and unrecognized. However much he may cry his wares, like a veritable Confucius, no government feels compelled to employ the services of a political scientist or a sociologist as such, as it is compelled to employ economists, lawyers, and even anthropologists. Is there not something anomalous here; and, if so, what?

One of the earlier of the self-styled political scientists, Jeremy Bentham, had a quite clear conception of his duties: to define the terms, to analyze the functions, to reform the system, and to codify the law. But, ironically enough, the politicians could see little use in the proffered advice of the prophet of utility, and the eccentric Utilitarian was left to wage an unending war against "the sinister interests." The patient when sick turns to a physician. But, de-

-265-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Freedom and Control in Modern Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.