Freedom and Control in Modern Society

By Morroe Berger; Theodore Abel | Go to book overview

14 ROBERT M. MACIVER'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO POLITICAL THEORY

DAVID SPITZ


POLITICAL FORMS AND HUMAN GOALS

Ever since Machiavelli, political theorists have understood, even if they have not always observed, the necessary distinction between political behavior in the positivistic sense and the ethical values by which such behavior is judged. It is the strength of Robert M. MacIver as a political thinker that he has utilized still another dimension in the study of politics; he has shown, along with Max Weber, that men's conceptions of what they ought to do are themselves determinants of what they actually do, and that, in turn, what men do or can do tends effectively to limit the range of their ethical obligations.1

____________________
1
Where, as in the first two sections of this paper, I have largely limited myself to an exposition of MacIver's ideas, I have made liberal use of his own language, unburdened, however, by the apparatus of quotation marks and page references. For his social philosophy, I have relied most heavily on Community ( 3d ed., London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., 1924) and The Elements of Social Science ( 9th ed., London: Methuen & Co., Ltd., 1949), and to a lesser degree on Society: A Textbook of Sociology ( New York: Rinehart & Company, Inc., 1937). His political theory is systematically developed in The Modern State ( London: Oxford University Press, 1926) and The Web of Government ( New York: The Macmillan Co., 1947); but I have also found useful "The Meaning of Liberty and Its Perversions," in Freedom: Its Meaning (ed. Anshen, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1940), pp. 278-287, Leviathan and the People ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1939). Towards an Abiding Peace ( New York: The Macmillan Co., 1945), and The Ramparts We Guard ( New York: The Macmillan Co., 1950). For his methodology, the major item is Social Causation ( Boston: Ginn & Com

-293-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Freedom and Control in Modern Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.