Inside Doctoring: Stages and Outcomes in the Professional Development of Physicians

By Robert H. Coombs; D. Scott May et al. | Go to book overview

Observations on Women in Medicine

Donna K. Whitney

In considering issues related to women in medicine, frequently we hear discussion of discrimination regarding medical school admissions, residency selections, faculty appointments, and academic advancement. We hear also about the effect of gender upon choice of specialty, referral patterns, and income. I will say at the outset that I have no knowledge of the statistics on these topics, little desire to learn them, and no intention of discussing them. My concern is with the people who study and practice medicine. How do they respond to the challenges of their profession, how do they change and grow? What becomes of their values, their ethics, their personalities, their beliefs? With regard to these issues, I am concerned equally with male physicians and females, even though in some ways the two genders probably experience these issues differently.

By now you may have heard it said that medical education and training are as much a process of being socialized as of being instructed. I would agree that there are certain normative beliefs and mores which are subtly but firmly urged upon us during the progressive rites of initiation into the profession, and I would contend that these values and mores tend toward the masculine rather than the feminine. We learn to speak with power rather than with authority, to give commands rather than to speak, to demand rather than suggest, to cure rather than to heal. These values and nuances of personal style can advance so insidiously as to go unnoticed until they are well established in the medical initiate. I personally have observed the gradual but inexorable leaching out of much that is soft, tender, humble, and creative from young physicians, to be replaced by an unnatural cockiness and brusqueness. I have observed this in myself, and have sometimes been surprised to hear myself speak with a voice that is not my own.

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Inside Doctoring: Stages and Outcomes in the Professional Development of Physicians
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 304

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.